body shame

Food Psych #114: How to Smash Diet Culture with Self-Compassion with Louise Adams

Louise Adams

Psychologist and author Louise Adams discusses why the Health at Every Size approach is essential in treating disordered eating, the problems with the "obesity epidemic" rhetoric, how trauma and body neglect shaped her relationship with food at a young age, why self-compassion is an essential antidote to shame, how to move from a deprivation mindset to an intuitive mindset with unconditional permission to eat, how to set firm and compassionate boundaries, and lots more. PLUS, Christy answers a listener question about how to handle feeling like you need to lose weight to manage a health condition, and how to stop judging yourself for eating "too much."

Louise is an Australian clinical psychologist, author, podcaster, trainer, and speaker. She owns Treat Yourself Well Sydney, a specialist psychology clinic for weight-inclusive health and wellbeing. Louise founded UNTRAPPED, an online diet recovery program, and hosts the All Fired Up! Podcast, where she meets with experts from around the world to debrief, rage, and unpack the (often misguided) messages we’re given about weight, food, exercise, and health.

Louise has a special interest and expertise in weight struggles, eating disorders, and body image. Her practice is rooted in the HAES principles of equitable support for people of all shapes and sizes. Louise’s life goal is to dismantle the prison of diet culture and emancipate people to appreciate compassionate, joyful, relaxed relationships with food, movement, and their bodies.

Louise has published two books. The Non-Diet Approach Guidebook for Psychologists and Counsellors (2014, co-authored with Fiona Willer, APD) is a manual for health professionals. Her latest book, Mindful Moments (2016) is for the general public, a practical guide to applying self-compassion for people who are time poor.

Louise is a member of the Australian Psychological Society (APS), a member of the Clinical College of the APS, and treasurer of HAES Australia.

In addition to everything else, Louise runs non-diet training workshops for other health professionals. She regularly speaks to the media on all issues health related, and has experience on radio, print and television. Read more about Louise at untrapped.com.au.

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We Discuss:

  • Louise’s relationship with food growing up, including not being attracted to food at a young age due in part to  struggling with misophonia

  • The impact of body trauma and body neglect on body image and body growth

  • Body policing

  • Diet culture

  • Relationships and body image

  • Feminism and criminal justice

  • Social justice and psychology

  • The importance of the broader context when grappling with individual struggles

  • Fatphobia in eating disorder treatment

  • Why BMI is an ineffective means of measuring health

  • Eating disorder recovery

  • The “obesity epidemic”

  • Critical thinking and weight science

  • Health at Every Size, the non-diet approach, and intuitive eating

  • Shame recovery

  • Restriction and rebound binge eating

  • Mindful eating and joyful eating

  • Self-compassion

  • Trauma and self-soothing with food (AKA emotional eating as a coping mechanism)

  • Deprivation vs unconditional permission to eat

  • Pleasure and satisfaction

  • Self-care

  • Mindful awareness and non-judgmental awareness

  • Setting firm and compassionate boundaries

  • The anti-diet community

 

Resources Mentioned

Some of the links below are affiliate links. Affiliates or not, we only recommend products and services that align with our values.

 

Listener Question of the Week

Do we need to lose weight to manage other health conditions? What exactly is a Health at Every Size approach to health? How do we eat intuitively and give ourselves unconditional permission while also being conscious of our holistic wellness? Is it possible that we’re eating too much on our intuitive eating journey?

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Food Psych #113: How to Cultivate Radical Body Love with Sonya Renee Taylor

Sonya Renee Taylor

Writer and activist Sonya Renee Taylor joins us to discuss why we need more radical body love in the world, how to deal with weight gain and weight stigma while learning intuitive eating, what mainstream body positivity gets wrong, why understanding oppression and intersecting identities is the key to creating a world that's *truly* body-positive, how to navigate diet culture as a body-acceptance activist, how to begin to untangle internalized oppression, and lots more. PLUS, Christy answers a listener question about how to tell the difference between self-care and orthorexic thinking.

Sonya Renee Taylor is the Founder and Radical Executive Officer of The Body is Not An Apology, a digital media and education company committed to radical self-love and body empowerment as the foundational tool for social justice and global transformation. TBINAA.com reaches over 1 million people each month in 140 countries with their articles and content focused on the intersection of bodies, personal transformation and social justice. Sonya is also an International award winning Performance Poet, Activist, speaker, and transformational leader whose work continues to have global reach. She has appeared across the US, New Zealand, Australia, England, Scotland, Sweden, Germany, Canada and the Netherlands. Sonya and her work has been seen, heard and read on HBO, BET, MTV, TV One, NPR, PBS, CNN, Oxygen Network, The New York Times, New York Magazine, MSNBC.com, Today.com, Huffington Post, Vogue Australia, Shape.com, Ms. Magazine and many more. She has shared stages with such luminaries as Carrie Mae Weems, Theaster Gates, Harry Belafonte, Dr. Cornell West, Hilary Rodham Clinton, the late Amiri Baraka and numerous others. Sonya continues to perform, speak and facilitate workshops globally. Visit her at www.sonya-renee.com or www.thebodyisnotanapology.com.

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We Discuss:

  • Sonya’s relationship with food growing up, including growing up in the Midwest in an African American family

  • Diet culture and body expectations

  • The communal nature of dieting and disordered eating

  • Body as currency and feminine value

  • Body image in relation to life circumstances

  • All-or-nothing behavior

  • Performance poetry

  • Body politics

  • Health at Every Size

  • The process of paradigm shifts

  • Shame, body judgment, and finding body peace

  • The role of community in body autonomy and body acceptance

  • Intersectional feminism

  • Being black in America, internalized racism, white supremacy, and the white beauty ideal

  • Social justice

  • Mainstream body positivity and the capitalist co-optation of the movement

  • Radical body love

  • Unpacking personal bias

  • Dealing with weight gain and grappling with weight stigma during the intuitive eating process

  • Awakening to oppression

  • Living in diet culture and navigating this body-negative world as anti-diet, body acceptance activists

 

Resources Mentioned

Some of the links below are affiliate links. Affiliates or not, we only recommend products and services that align with our values.

  • FAT!SO? by Marilyn Wann

  • Submit your questions for a chance to have them answered on the podcast!

  • My online course, Intuitive Eating Fundamentals, which includes listener Q&As and access to my private Facebook support group. (Get in there now because the price goes up on August 1st!)

  • Leave a rating and review and subscribe on iTunes!

 

Listener Question of the Week

How do we eat intuitively while also keeping our nutritional wellness in mind, but without falling back into orthorexic-type eating? How does privilege impact our perceptions of, and ability to, obtain “health?” How do we approach health in a true holistic way, including our emotional, social, and mental health? How do we differentiate between self-care and self-control?

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Food Psych #106: How to Stop Pursuing Weight Loss with Ijeoma Oluo

Ijeoma Oluo

Writer and activist Ijeoma Oluo shares why she gave up the pursuit of weight loss even though she had "succeeded" at dieting, how she stepped away from the scale and made peace with her size, why body acceptance is a journey and not a destination, how to help kids develop peaceful relationships with their bodies, why worrying about your weight robs you of your life, why we need to stop obsessing about our bodies, how food insecurity affects people's relationships with food, and lots more.

Ijeoma Oluo is a Seattle-based Writer, Speaker and Internet Yeller. Her work on race, feminism,
and other social issues has been featured in The Guardian, The Stranger, The Washington Post, TIME Magazine, and more. She is the Editor at Large at The Establishment. Her book, So You Want To Talk About Race, will be published in early 2018 with Seal Press. You can find her yelling on Twitter at @ijeomaoluo, and on her website at IjeomaOluo.com.

Fellow health pros: Sign up for the EDRDpro Symposium to learn about treating disordered eating from 15 experts in the field, including Christy!

Grab Christy's free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food, to start your intuitive eating journey. You can also text "FOODPSYCH" to the phone number 44222 to get it on the go!

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We Discuss:

  • Ijeoma’s relationship with food growing up, including her experience with food insecurity

  • The issues with food access for low-income people

  • Food hoarding as a response to deprivation

  • The impact of sexual assault on our eating behaviors

  • The invisibility of fat bodies and the privileges of thin bodies

  • The myth that weight loss is the cure to all ills

  • Size discrimination

  • Systemic injustice

  • The impact of weight loss surgery on a person’s self-image

  • The impossibility of the beauty ideal

  • Body image in relation to the scale

  • Body acceptance as a continuous process

  • Appreciating our body for its part in achieving our life accomplishments

  • Honoring our true selves

  • Finding an individualized, *truly* holistic approach to health

  • Body positivity vs. body neutrality

  • A child’s experience with their body pre-diet culture

  • Fatphobia in the medical community and in schools

  • How to shield kids from the diet mentality

  • The BMI obsession and the “childhood obesity” bogeyman

  • Thinking critically about messages we receive from authority figures

  • The need for doctors to be trained in Health at Every Size

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Food Psych #105: Body-Acceptance Secrets with Jessamyn Stanley

Jessamyn Stanley - Body-positive yoga

Jessamyn Stanley, acclaimed yoga teacher and body-acceptance advocate, joins us to discuss overcoming decades of dieting, healing from oppressive beauty standards, learning to accept her size and stop pursuing weight loss, the "yoga-industrial complex" vs. real yoga, her new book Every Body Yoga, being an Instagram sensation, navigating people's expectations of her as a yoga teacher, and lots more!

Jessamyn Stanley is the author of Every Body Yoga, as well as an internationally recognized yoga teacher, award-winning Instagram star (@mynameisjessamyn), and body-positive advocate. She has been profiled by a wide range of media, including Good Morning America, TIME, New York, Glamour, Shape, People, Essence, Lenny Letter, and many others. When she’s not on the road teaching, she lives in Durham, North Carolina. Visit her online at JessamynStanley.com, on Twitter at @JessNotJazz, and on Facebook at MyNameIsJessamyn.

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Grab Christy's new free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food. You can also text "FOODPSYCH" to the phone number 44222 to get it on the go!

 

We Discuss:

  • Jessamyn’s relationship with food growing up, including experiencing food scarcity

  • Coping with family stress and engaging in emotional eating

  • The impact of yoga on Jessamyn’s relationship with food and her body

  • Self-taught intuitive eating

  • Non-judgmental body awareness

  • Veganism, yoga, and classism

  • Trauma and eating disorder awareness in yoga practice

  • The intersections of capitalism and diet culture

  • The perils of pursuing weight loss

  • Educating children about Health at Every Size and body positivity

  • The intersections of fatphobia and racism

  • Challenging the urge for assimilation

  • The benefits of sharing our struggles publicly

  • The role of photography in Jessamyn’s body image journey

  • Self-compassion vs. shame and self-judgment

  • The yoga-industrial complex

  • The spiritual component of classical yoga practice

  • Size diversity in yoga

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #103: Social Justice and Racism in the Body-Positive Movement with Gloria Lucas

Gloria Lucas, founder of Nalgona Positivity Pride

Body-acceptance activist Gloria Lucas shares why she created an organization devoted to helping people of color heal from diet culture, why the traditional medical model of eating disorder recovery didn't work for her, the role of trauma in her disordered eating, how intersectional feminism helped in her healing, why the mainstream body-positive movement isn't meeting the needs of people of color and other marginalized groups, the role of historical trauma in creating and maintaining body shame, and lots more!

Gloria is the founder and director of Nalgona Positivity Pride, a xicana-indigenous body-positive project that focuses on eating disorders awareness and cultural affirmation. She is a frequent lecturer across the country covering topics such as the connection of historical trauma and disordered eating. Gloria’s work has been featured at the Huffington Post, Univision, Bitch Magazine, and The Body is not an Apology. She lives in Los Angeles, CA where she is an active entrepreneur and eating disorders support group organizer. Find her on Instagram at @nalgonapositivitypride and on Tumblr at @nalgonapride.

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Grab Christy's new free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food. You can also text "FOODPSYCH" to the phone number 44222 to get it on the go!

 

We Discuss:

  • Gloria’s relationship with food growing up, including her experience with binge eating disorder and bulimia

  • The role of depression, trauma, poverty, family instability, and violence in the development of disordered eating

  • Eating disorders as both emotional regulation and self-punishment

  • The impact of hypersexualization on body image

  • Religion, sexuality, and shame

  • Feminism, diet culture, and eating disorders

  • The lack of representation of people of color in eating-disorder treatment and the body-positive movement

  • Recovery versus healing

  • Harm reduction and eating disorders

  • The limitations of the current eating-disorder-recovery model, especially for people of color

  • Nalgona Positivity Pride and decolonizing eating disorder treatment

  • The need for more people of color (POC) as treatment providers

  • Racism, privilege, discrimination, and the white-supremacist beauty ideal

  • Intersectional identity and oppression

  • The privilege that comes from being in a "plus-size" body versus a "fat" body that faces systemic oppression

  • Health trolling

  • The impact of family on body image and disordered eating

  • Food insecurity, food scarcity, and binge eating

  • Historical trauma, intergenerational trauma, and systemic oppression

  • Capitalism, mass incarceration, and current political rhetoric

  • The limitations of the current body-positivity movement for POC and people who don’t conform to the status quo

  • Bodily autonomy

  • Rejecting the expectation of beauty

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #101: How to Honor Your True Hungers & Find Body Acceptance with Rachel Estapa

Rachel Estapa.jpg

Size-acceptance advocate and yoga teacher Rachel Estapa discusses how being a larger-bodied child led to early experiences of shame and dieting, why diet culture's promise to "fix" us is so alluring, the connection between physical and emotional hungers,  why rediscovering her loves and desires in life was essential to her recovery from dieting, how the practice of yoga helped show her the path to liberation, and lots more!

Rachel Estapa, founder of More to Love®, is a certified life coach, certified Kripalu Yoga teacher, writer, speaker and social entrepreneur who educates and supports plus size people on approaches to positive body image and wellness, enabling all bodies to lead more empowered lives. Find her online at MoreToLoveWithRachel.com.

Grab Christy's new free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food. You can also text "FOODPSYCH" to the phone number 44222 to get it on the go!

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We Discuss:

  • Rachel’s relationship with food growing up, including associating food with love and family

  • Body shame in relation to food choices

  • Separating the critical voice from the true inner voice of compassion

  • The line between educating others and preserving our own body-positive journey

  • Reconnecting to body trust

  • How intuitive eating leads to intuitive living

  • Creating a loving relationship with the past

  • Rachel’s first experience with a nutritionist

  • The importance of access to plus-size clothing options

  • Rachel's Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis

  • The connection between physical hunger and emotional hunger

  • Rediscovering satisfaction with food and movement on the intuitive eating journey

  • The impact of patriarchy and misogyny on femme socialization

  • Yoga, eating disorder recovery, and embodiment

  • Reconnecting with and accepting emotions

  • Eating as an intimate act

  • Food as a part of our relationships and human connection

  • Navigating and pushing back against diet culture and the diet mentality

  • Rachel’s reasons for creating More to Love

  • Finding everlasting, honest, and individual body acceptance

  • The intersection of mystery and science

  • Tolerating constant change and growth

  • The trouble with deriving self-worth from external factors

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Food Psych #98: How to Rediscover the Joy in Food and Movement with Kylie Mitchell

Kylie Mitchell

Food blogger and fellow anti-diet dietitian Kylie Mitchell shares how she overcame dieting, disordered eating, and compulsive exercise; why she wanted to start a food blog that celebrates food and eschews the orthorexic messages of other "wellness" blogs; the insidious ways in which diet culture is woven into the fabric of how we talk about food and health; why non-diet approaches like Health at Every Size and intuitive eating are important for *everyone* of *every* body size; how she improved her relationship with movement and let go of compulsive exercise; what the transition from an eating disorder into intuitive eating looks like; and lots more!

Kylie Mitchell is a Registered Dietitian with a Masters of Public Health. She is the founder of the food/lifestyle blog immaEATthat.com, which she started six years ago in an effort to stop disordered eating and help people fall back in love with a healthful relationship with food and their body. Kylie works to promote positive body image, intuitive eating and Health at Every Size. Kylie also specializes in creative recipe development and high-res food photography. When not behind the computer or camera, Kylie works as an eating disorder dietitian. Kylie lives in Houston, TX with her husband and puppy, where she likes to over-share on Instagram. Find her online at immaEATthat.com.

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We Discuss:

  • Kylie’s relationship with food growing up, including living in a household obsessed with dieting and the thin ideal

  • Body trust and the pregnancy experience

  • Eating disorders and disordered eating as coping mechanisms

  • Kylie’s experience with restriction, binge eating, and overexercising to compensate for bingeing behavior

  • The lack of Health at Every Size and intuitive eating instruction in dietetics and nutrition education

  • Disordered eating within the nutrition and dietetics field

  • The spectrum of eating behavior

  • Diet culture, the diet mentality, and how our world perpetuates disordered eating

  • The importance of non-diet, intuitive eating, and HAES resources in recovery from eating disorders and diet culture

  • Kylie’s work on her blog, how it started from a disordered and obsessional place, and how it eventually became a place of healing and recovery

  • “Healthy” food blogging and orthorexia

  • The responsibility that all dietitians have to show that all foods fit and the ways in which they often fall short

  • Breaking down the morality around food choices

  • Making peace with movement and finding a body-positive, weight-neutral movement practice

  • The role of yoga in Kylie’s eating disorder recovery and finding embodiment

  • Body dissatisfaction, fatphobia, and finding body acceptance

  • Navigating relationships in recovery and seeking outside support when we need it

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #97: The Life-Changing Magic of Intuitive Eating with Sumner Brooks

Sumner Brooks RD

Body-positive dietitian Sumner Brooks shares why she started bingeing at a young age, how she finally healed her relationship with food through intuitive eating, how diet culture convinces us we're "not good enough," why emotional eating is related to restriction, why it's so important (and difficult) to accept and honor your hunger, how conventional nutrition education leads us astray, and lots more!  

Sumner Brooks is a registered dietitian nutritionist specializing in eating disorders and a Certified Intuitive Eating counselor. She's the producer of the EDRDpro Symposium for professionals, She's also the co-author of the non-diet guidebook Savvy Girl: A Guide to Eating, a short 4 hour-read for women of all ages based on the Intuitive Eating philosophy. Sumner also works at a gastroenterology specialty clinic in Portland, Oregon where she utilizes a non-diet approach to treat patients struggling with digestive concerns and eating disorders. Out of the office she's found soaking up time with her 2 year old daughter and getting outdoors in the beauty of the Pacific Northwest. Sign up for her EDRDpro Symposium for webinars with 15 experts on intuitive eating and Health at Every Size (including Christy!), and find her online at EattoLiveHappy.com.

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We Discuss:

  • Sumner’s disordered relationship with food from a young age that included bingeing and overeating

  • How food insecurity can impact the way we relate to food

  • Sumner’s experience with emotional eating

  • Coping with the need for more variety and “fun” foods in a restrictive household

  • The '90s fat-free craze

  • Sumner’s struggle to satisfy her hunger as a young athlete

  • How social pressure from our peers can influence and increase disordered eating behavior

  • The ways in which magazines and advertising perpetuate the overwhelming feeling of never being “enough,” and push us to chase the beauty ideal

  • How self-hate and negative body image can act as precursors to eating disorders

  • The role of feminism and body positivity in eating disorder recovery

  • How intimate relationships are impacted by disordered eating behaviors

  • Sumner’s experience with various eating disorders, including the restrict-binge cycle and compulsive exercise

  • The role of depression, loneliness, and stress in eating behavior

  • Therapy for eating disorders

  • Sumner’s experience as a dietitian, and how it guided her own path to food peace and intuitive eating

  • How shame and guilt perpetuate binge eating and the restrict-binge cycle

  • The impact of struggling with biological hunger and emotional hunger simultaneously

  • Making peace with and honoring physical hunger

  • The problem with the calories-in-calories-out nutrition model

  • A dietitian’s role in eating disorder prevention and treatment

  • The Health at Every Size, non-diet approach to nutrition counseling

  • The connection between healthism and disordered eating

  • How to bring people into the intuitive eating, anti-diet, Health at Every Size world

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #96: How to Trust Your Body & Honor Its Wisdom with Tracy Brown

Tracy Brown RD

Fellow Health at Every Size dietitian Tracy Brown shares why she started dieting and fighting her body in adolescence, how restriction quickly spiraled into an eating disorder, why difficulty with setting boundaries played into her relationship with food, how she found her way to recovery and started down the path to becoming a dietitian, how she began to tune in to her body's wisdom and practice intuitive eating, why she dove into practicing from a Health at Every Size paradigm, and lots more. She also leads us in a special meditation for helping reconnect to your body!

Tracy Brown is a somatic nutrition therapist, registered dietitian, and attuned eating coach in private practice providing in-person, phone and online counseling since 2006. Tracy works with people on a soul level because she believes not wanting to be in the body is a way of protecting oneself, so her work is about nourishing the nervous system to feel safe enough to feel emotion and actually heal. She specializes in the treatment of eating disorders and eating problems for both adults and children, as well as issues related to overextending the body, including adrenal fatigue, hormone issues, PCOS and gut health.

Tracy routinely teaches intuitive eating workshops and disordered-eating-related talks throughout Florida, including at the University of Florida and Santa Fe College in Gainesville, FL; Flager College; and Florida Gulf Coast University in Ft Myers. She is also the guest Nutrition Therapist for Feast, an online intuitive eating program run by past Food Psych guest Rachel Cole. Tracy has appeared on many podcasts discussing topics including intuitive eating, trauma healing, positive body image, and recovery.

She believes that healing food and weight concerns is really about deciding to embrace our humanity in the diverse and amazing bodies we have. Living and feeling fully with courage and being dedicated to the fullest expression of who we are is the point. Learn more about Tracy and her work at TracyBrownRD.com.

This episode is brought to you by Plum Deluxe, a Fair Trade tea company that's committed to fostering mindfulness, compassion, and community. 

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We Discuss:

  • Tracy’s relationship with food growing up, including a childhood that included farming and exposure to sports at an early age

  • Tracy’s experience with subliminal messages about “acceptable” body size

  • The emotions attached to the dieting experience

  • How dating and socializing impacted Tracy’s ideas of perfection and her understanding of what is valued in our society

  • Tracy’s first experience with a diet and the resulting spiral into disordered eating, restriction, obsessive exercise, and anorexia

  • How eating disorders can be used to create boundaries around us and isolate us from the world

  • Rape culture and consent in the context of bodily autonomy

  • The relationship between eating disorders and control

  • Tracy’s journey through early eating disorder recovery and her introduction to intuitive eating

  • Tracy’s experience in college studying dietetics and nutrition, including studying with the knowledge that she would be following an anti-diet path once she received her degree

  • The impact of deprivation on the restrict-binge cycle

  • How the diet mentality and mental restriction impact the ability to break the binge cycle

  • Tracy’s trials and tribulations trying to find a job in dietetics, and her eventual first supervision under the guidance of an intuitive eating practitioner

  • Tracy’s experience with self-experimentation in learning her own hunger and fullness

  • The role of therapy in eating disorder recovery and intuitive eating

  • Tracy’s transition into private practice and Health at Every Size work, including her frustration with the diet model in mainstream dietetics

  • The challenge that HAES clinicians face in making space for their client’s mourning process around letting go of weight loss

  • Letting go of the instinct to fix problems rather than feel problems

  • How diet culture and fatphobia impact people of all sizes

  • The role of the HAES, body-positive community in supporting people when they doubt the truth about diet culture

  • How nonlinear the recovery and intuitive eating process can be

  • The judgment and moral values we attach to food behaviors

  • Tracy’s use of somatics and meditation to support eating disorder recovery, body acceptance, and inner wisdom

  • How to prepare clients for the diet culture of the outside world and create boundaries around their own process

  • How meditation can help ground the body, center the self, and foster self-compassion

  • How to have gratitude for coping mechanisms that no longer serve us

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #92: How to Break Free from Body Shame & Dieting with Fiona Sutherland

Fiona Sutherland

Fellow Health at Every Size dietitian Fiona Sutherland joins us to discuss our bodies' intuitive wisdom about food and nourishment, how diet culture cuts us off from that wisdom and how to reclaim it, why she almost quit dietetics and how she ultimately found her way to the anti-diet movement, why we need what she calls "radical nourishment" to heal from diet culture, the importance of taking pleasure in food, how she's working to bring the Health at Every Size approach into training for dietitians, and lots more!

Fiona Sutherland is an Accredited Practising Dietitian & Nutritionist from Melbourne, Australia. She is Director of Body Positive Australia & The Mindful Dietitian, specialising in Mindful Eating, Eating Disorders, eating behaviour and body image from a Health At Every Size and Non Diet Approach. She is also a Sports Dietitian, consulting for The Australian Ballet. Fiona is passionate about supporting people & communities heal their relationship with food and body, and is an advocate for bringing Non Diet Approach training into Universities throughout Australia. Find her at TheMindfulDietitian.com.au and BodyPositiveAustralia.com.au.

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We Discuss:

  • Fiona’s relationship with food and her body growing up, including learning about the moralization around food and that certain bodies were considered “better” than others (also known as size discrimination, weight bias, and fat phobia)

  • Fiona’s experience with thin privilege, including her own internalization of diet culture

  • The protective elements of thin privilege, including potentially avoiding the disordered eating or diet path due to fewer societal expectations to “control” weight gain

  • Fiona’s experience being the older sibling of someone living in a larger body

  • The natural, intuitive wisdom that our body is born with and the ways in which diet culture drives that wisdom out and promotes disconnection

  • How diet culture and diet mentality language seep into our vocabulary to the point that it is normalized and unchecked

  • The normalization of dieting and the ways in which it is unquestioned even by those whose core values don’t jive with diet culture

  • The morality attached to body size

  • How historical parallels to many other civil rights issues are mimicked within the size diversity, anti-diet movement

  • The importance of finding our voices and our radical values within the body activism sphere

  • Fiona’s concept of radical nourishment, including honoring our hunger, fulfilling our needs outside of food, and encouraging our desire for pleasure

  • Fiona and Christy’s experiences with clients involved in 12-step programs and struggling with other substance addictions while also dealing with an eating disorder, as well as the abstinence model in relation to food

  • The addiction model in relation to food, including the lack of definitive research and the integral consideration of guilt and restriction that leads to bingeing and feeling out of control

  • The perception of control and holding things tightly versus holding things gently

  • Giving yourself space for compassion for when food choices end up making our bodies feel uncomfortable and for when we are attempting to let go of food rules

  • Fiona’s experience with gymnastics, and how her coach helped her and her team avoid body criticism

  • How to cultivate care and connection to your body through its many changes throughout life, including the specific female experiences of postpartum, puberty, and menopause

  • Fiona’s evolving experience as a practicing dietitian, including the value in all dietitians understanding their own experience and learning from their clients

  • Fiona’s experience in dietetics school and her continuing education, including her tendency to question her education and the lack of Health at Every Size and coaching education within the program

  • Fiona’s experience taking time off to teach outdoor education to young children, along with the practical education it gave her in lived experience and the human condition

  • Fiona’s first dietetics job at a weight loss clinic, her introduction to a non-diet approach and intuitive eating and her subsequent rebellion within her weight-loss-centric job, and her eventual transition into eating disorder work and sports nutrition

  • Fiona’s later work in dietetics, including a focus on teaching dietetics students about eating disorders and HAES, working with ballerinas on eating disorder prevention, and working with athletes on body image concerns post-career

  • How major life changes impact how we feel about our bodies

  • The ways in which we can practice HAES through stealth, and how that may allow us to make a difference in spaces that need the message the most

  • The importance of exposing dietitian students to HAES education and showing them that there is another approach

  • Fiona’s experience with her mindfulness practice, including how it transformed her client work and her expansion into the mindfulness world professionally

  • Christy and Fiona’s journey finding a community within the dietetics world through eating disorder work and HAES

  • How important it is to make room for making mistakes, whether it’s as a professional or within your personal intuitive eating journey

  • Yoga and the body positive movement, and the ways in which some yoga practices can be nourishing and others can perpetuate the same diet-centric movement practices

 

Resources Mentioned:

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Food Psych #91: Becoming an Anti-Diet Dietitian with Jennifer McGurk

Jennifer McGurk, anti-diet dietitian

Body-positive dietitian Jennifer McGurk shares her history of body shame and disordered eating, her journey to recovery, how her career evolved alongside her own relationship with food, why she's fighting to make Health at Every Size training part of the academic requirements for dietitians and other healthcare professionals, how pregnancy changed her relationship with her body, and lots more!

Jennifer McGurk, RDN, CDN, CDE, CEDRD is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist whose mission is to help people heal from diets, and find peace and balance with their food choices. She is the owner of Eat With Knowledge in Nyack, NY. She leads a team of dietitians who support the philosophy, “Feel fabulous about food!”

As a Certified Eating Disorders Registered Dietitian, Jennifer combines her expertise in medical nutrition therapy, psychology, and physiology to help clients understand their eating behaviors, and gain the insight needed to make positive changes for their health. She is an expert in the field of eating disorders and also supervises other Registered Dietitians.

Jennifer has created the business Pursuing Private Practice, along with authoring a book series of the same name, to help other healthcare professionals reach their goal of owning their own business. Pursuing Private Practice: 10 Steps to Start Your Own Business was released in January 2016, and Pursuing Private Practice: 10 Steps to Grow Your Own Business was released in April 2016. She is working on an e-course that will be out April 2017. Find her online at EatWithKnowledge.com or PursuingPrivatePractice.com, and be sure to sign her HAES petition!

Be sure to join the new Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world!

 

We Discuss:

  • Jennifer’s relationship with food growing up, including her experience finding joy in food up until diet culture took hold in her teenage years

  • Jennifer’s struggles with body image, and her eventual first weight loss “success” that led her down the path of disordered eating

  • The protective element of thin privilege in our fat-phobic world

  • How the influence of peers can impact our own food and movement choices and potentially encourage dangerous changes

  • Jennifer’s experience with binge eating disorder, including how intense restriction contributed to the development of her eating disorder

  • How bingeing is your body’s way of protecting itself from starvation

  • Jennifer’s experience with an orthorexic mindset (“clean” eating, morality attached to food), including her desire to study nutrition in order to find the “answer” to health and the ways in which nutrition education helped her to see that all foods fit in a balanced life

  • Jennifer’s decision to seek out therapy to help support her eating disorder recovery

  • The importance of eating-disorder-trained dietitians and Health-at-Every-Size-informed dietitians

  • Navigating the world of HAES after coming from a classic dietetics, weight loss background

  • Jennifer’s petition to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in regards to the certification in Obesity and Weight Management from the Commission on Dietetic Registration

  • Jennifer’s transition to being a HAES dietitian, working with clients struggling with eating disorders, and moving into private practice

  • The fear that many dietitians have of letting go of selling weight loss

  • The importance of networking within the HAES community, as well as tailoring marketing to be 100% anti-diet and HAES, rather than straddling the line between weight management and HAES

  • The explosion of the HAES, body-positive, intuitive eating movement, and the potential danger of mainstream intuitive eating and HAES

  • How to approach weight concerns as a HAES, anti-diet dietitian

  • What is really behind the desire to lose weight

  • The myths that weight loss, motherhood, and romantic love will give us immediate life fulfillment

  • Jennifer’s experience as a mother, including body image concerns during her pregnancy and dealing with the postpartum period

  • Understanding that when we want to turn back to dieting or have negative body image thoughts, we are often using our bodies to ignore what’s really going on within

  • The value in sharing our recovery stories and supporting one another by showing we are not alone in our struggles

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #90: Raising Kids with Body Trust and Intuitive Eating with Hilary Kinavey of Be Nourished

Hilary Kinavey

Psychotherapist and HAES activist Hilary Kinavey shares her history of chronic dieting, the role of feminism in her recovery, how she helps her kids develop a healthy relationship with food, how romantic relationships affected her body image, why there need to be more body-positive role models for navigating aging and body changes throughout life, and lots more!  

Hilary Kinavey, MS, LPC, is a licensed professional counselor and cofounder of Be Nourished, LLC. Her work encourages movement toward a radically compassionate model of healing to address internalized body shame and associated patterns of chronic dieting and disordered eating. She is the co-creator of Body Trust™ Wellness, a Certified Daring Way™ facilitator-candidate, and a transformational workshop leader. Hilary is a popular speaker on topics such as Health at Every Size®, intuitive eating, and body respect in health care communities, and a regular contributor to the Huffington Post. Find her online at BeNourished.org.

Join the new Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world!

 

We Discuss:

  • Hilary’s relationship to food growing up, including navigating conflicting messages around food and her body

  • The relationship between feminism, dieting, and diet culture, and the way in which diets are marketed as a means of power and control to powerful women

  • Hilary’s diagnosis of PCOS, and how it impacted her relationship with food and her body

  • The natural health and naturopathic perspective, and the ways many of the natural health recommendations are just more diets in disguise

  • How when we heal our relationship with food we can approach health from a place of self-care rather than self-control

  • The current medical model that equates weight and health, and the need for Health at Every Size education within the medical community

  • How irresponsible and unethical it is to suggest weight loss for health when the research shows that it is nearly impossible to maintain, and how fuzzy the research on “obesity” even is

  • The ways in which letting go of dieting and moving to intuitive eating can trigger a mourning process

  • How our culture yearns for authenticity and human connection, how dieting prevents this connection, and how the HAES and body-positive community allows room for authenticity and letting go of shame

  • How powerful it can be when we let go of dieting, find our voices, and find our power

  • Hilary’s introduction to intuitive eating, including her experience with a therapist who helped her reconnect with food and her body

  • Hilary’s shifting relationship with her family due to her own identity within the anti-diet movement versus their identity within diet culture

  • The difficulty of engaging with people who are still indoctrinated in diet culture when you yourself have emerged from the dynamic

  • A parent’s role in the development of a child’s body image, including the importance of not commenting on bodies in any capacity around children in order to foster positive or neutral body image

  • Raising children in a body-neutral environment, and how to navigate teaching children HAES while also dealing with differing perspectives in other institutions such as school

  • Interfering as a parent in schools that teach potentially triggering behavior in the name of health

  • The eating competence model and Ellyn Satter’s work

  • Relationships and body image, including the realization that the connection with our partner has little to do with the way our bodies look

  • Hilary’s relationship with her body during and after pregnancy, including her difficulty reclaiming her sexuality

  • The need for female role models who exemplify unabashed ownership of their own body, especially in terms of unapologetic sexuality within female aging

  • Hilary’s experience as a mother and businessowner, and how her relationship with her body and herself has been challenged

  • How “letting go” is a lifelong process, from eating disorders to business dynamics

  • The importance of moving out of our heads and into our bodies

  • The concept of body trust, and the need for clinicians to be trained in body trust for eating disorder recovery and letting go of chronic dieting

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #86: Body Positivity & Social Justice with Dianne Bondy

Dianne Bondy - Yoga Teacher & Body Image Activist

Yoga teacher and body-positive activist Dianne Bondy shares how a body-shaming father led her to develop an eating disorder in childhood and adolescence, how yoga helped in her recovery, why the yoga industry needs to be more welcoming of all bodies, why body positivity is a social justice issue, and lots more! 

Dianne Bondy is a celebrated yoga teacher, social justice activist and leading voice of the Yoga For All movement. Her inclusive view of yoga asana and philosophy inspires and empowers thousands of followers around the world – regardless of their shape, size, ethnicity, or level of ability.

Dianne contributes to Yoga International, Do You Yoga, and Elephant Journal. She is featured and profiled in International media outlets: The Guardian, Huffington Post, Cosmopolitan, People and more. She is a spokesperson for diversity in yoga and yoga for larger bodies, as seen in her work with Pennington’s, Gaiam, and the Yoga & Body Image Coalition. Her work is published in the books Yoga and Body Image, and Yes Yoga Has Curves. Find her online at DianneBondyYoga.com and YogaSteya.com.

Join the new Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world! 

 

We Discuss:

  • Dianne’s relationship with food growing up, including a contentious relationship with her father that twisted food into a negative experience, and her exposure to eating disorder treatment in the early 1980s

  • How pervasive the messaging is around women’s bodies, and how we are frequently told we are not good enough

  • Dianne’s conflicts around being a yogi and someone in recovery from an eating disorder in relation to vegansim and vegetarianism

  • The ways in which yoga can feel dogmatic and triggering when practiced in a diet framework

  • Why we must put self-care, self-love, and our own needs first when certain ideologies may put our recovery or safety in jeopardy

  • Why the classic aesthetic of yoga (white, able-bodied, thin, woman) is so damaging to those who do not fit within the cultural ideal

  • Diet culture’s sneaky hiding places, and the ways in which the diet mentality is just a product of the capitalist machine

  • The pervasiveness of fatphobia within the medical community

  • The importance of educating people on Health at Every Size and true body positivity

  • Dianne’s a-ha moment in her eating disorder recovery, including the big part that yoga played in recovery

  • Dianne’s journey to find yoga for all bodies

  • The co-option of the body positivity movement, how frustrating it is to live in a world that tries to bar all bodies from healing practices such as yoga, and the ways in which we can use true body positivity to fight against the diet mentality

  • The ways in which diet culture acts as tool of the patriarchy and limits women in their political and cultural power

  • Dianne’s vision for the downfall of the diet industry, and the amazing work being done in the social justice community to push back against diet culture

  • The power in embracing self-love and self-healing

  • Why social media is helping in the fight against diet culture

  • Body positivity and size acceptance as a social and political movement, and how pushback indicates progress

  • HAES as a civil rights movement

  • Dianne’s experience with the 2016 U.S. election as a Canadian

  • Millennial hate, the impact of Baby Boomer policy, and the ways in which the American experience has paved the way for a hateful, bigoted ideology

  • The impossibility of the young, white beauty ideal and its oppressive impacts

  • Oppression, white supremacy, and the ways in which the world is simultaneously changing and regressing

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #77: How to Handle Weight Stigma & Body Shame in the Family with Joanne Soolman

Joanne Levy Soolman - Health at Every Size Dietitian

Fellow Health at Every Size dietitian Joanne Soolman shares how weight stigma manifested in her family, how she overcame body shame and discovered Health at Every Size, how she handles having a sister who's a prominent Weight Watchers leader, and lots more!

Joanne Levy Soolman, MS, RD, LDN, is a registered dietitian and co-owner of Soolman Nutrition and Wellness, LLC located in Wellesley, MA. She and her husband Jonah, who is also a registered dietitian, provide outpatient nutrition counseling services for those in southeastern New England. Joanne got her BA in Psychology from Brown University and her MS in Nutrition and Health Promotion from Simmons College. Joanne specializes in nutrition counseling for individuals struggling with eating disorders and disordered eating. In addition to being a professional member of the Multiservice Eating Disorder Association, she is a proud member of the Association for Size Diversity and Health, promoting the principles of Health at Every Size®. Find her on her website at SoolmanNutrition.com.

 

We Discuss:

  • Joanne’s relationship with food growing up, including being taught the association of eating “too much” food with being fat, and discussions with her family regarding the thin ideal

  • How Joanne’s experiences at the doctor’s office as a young child fed into the obesity hysteria and a heavy focus on weight and food intake

  • The issues within the current medical model of weight regulation

  • Joanne’s first experience with a diet, including Slim Fast and beginning Jenny Craig during puberty, as well as Joanne’s first experience with disordered eating and restrictions and how the positive attention fed into the disordered patterns

  • The feeling of “failure” in relation to weight gain

  • Joanne’s journey to Health at Every Size 

  • How having a supportive partner can make such a difference in intuitive eating and body positivity

  • The difficulties doing body image work

  • The ways in which Joanne has navigated having a family member heavily involved in the pro-diet industry

  • How to let go of the weight-loss goal as a nutrition professional

  • The challenge of being involved with a family that subscribes to the diet mentality and the thin ideal while being a HAES dietitian

  • The future of the diet industry, and whether we will see a pro-HAES world soon

  • The pros and cons of HAES and body-positive activism, including internet trolls and fat phobia, as well as surprising acts of kindness

 

Resources Mentioned

 

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Food Psych #74: The Truth About Emotional Eating with Isabel Foxen Duke

Isabel Foxen Duke - Emotional Eating - Stop Fighting Food

Isabel Foxen Duke returns! We discuss the #1 reason why people engage in emotional eating and bingeing, why reclaiming your right to eat emotionally might be a key to healing your relationship with food, why recommendations for weight loss are scientifically unsound, how the effort to control our food can transfer to other areas of life after eating disorder recovery, why meditation and spiritual practice is lifelong work, and lots more!

Isabel Foxen Duke helps women stop fighting food. After struggling with binge-eating for most of her life, and trying to overcome emotional eating and binge-eating through various approaches to food—Isabel finally discovered that these attempts to control her food and her body, were at the root of the problem itself. She now teaches women struggling with binge-eating how to do the very thing they're most afraid of, and the very thing they need to do to recover: let go. Grab her free video training series, Stop Fighting Food, to learn more about her work.

 

We Discuss:

  • Why the concept of “emotional eating” is misleading, and why we really need to be focusing on diet culture instead

  • How moralizing food feeds into the diet mentality

  • The differences between binge eating and emotional eating

  • The role of fatphobia in food policing

  • Why we need to include body autonomy in our body positivity

  • How to shift making our choices from a place of self-control to making our choices from a place of self-care

  • Recognizing binge eating as a response to deprivation

  • Why deprivation isn’t always about the amount of food being eaten

  • An explanation of the “Last Supper Mentality,” and why it contributes to binge eating

  • The pervasive nature of diet culture, and why letting go of the diet mentality is so difficult in this diet culture

  • How we can reclaim the term “emotional eating,” and the importance of regarding it as a neutral coping strategy rather than moralizing it

  • The current research and theories on why we turn to food as a coping mechanism

  • Why “food addiction” and “emotional eating” wouldn’t exist without dieting

  • The value in giving up control for overall mental health

  • The ways in which food control has become the new religion

  • How obsession can transfer to different areas of our life, and why surrendering to the chaos and engaging in the spiritual process is continuous work

  • The power of saying no and setting your boundaries, and how our work around food bleeds into other aspects of our lives

  • The role of radical acceptance in recovery from disordered eating

  • The problem with the “Self-Compassion Diet” and the “Love-Yourself-Skinny Diet”

  • Why the desire to lose weight isn’t a problem, but the promise of weight loss is

  • How unethical promising weight loss is, and the need for evidence-based medicine in the health field

  • Isabel’s personal experience in in-patient recovery, and the multiple stages of recovery

  • Why body image work, body positivity, and body acceptance are essential to healing from eating disorders and chronic dieting

  • The truth that shame isn’t motivating, and the healing that can be found when we let go of body shame

  • How important it is to surround yourself with body-positive culture in the healing process

  • The different levels of body-image work

  • Refinery29’s new 67% Project, and why representation of plus-size women in mainstream media is profoundly important

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #72: How to Beat Body Shame & Binge Eating with Lynn Chen

Lynn Chen - body image - eating disorder activist

Actor, food blogger, and body-image activist Lynn Chen shares how getting teased in childhood led her to develop binge eating disorder, how becoming an actor affected her body image, and lots more.

Lynn Chen is an actor and body image activist. She has a diverse resume, ranging from singing on The Metropolitan Opera Stage, to starring in Sony Pictures Classics' "Saving Face," narrating the international bestseller "Crazy Rich Asians," and touring with Dischord Records' punk band E.D. Sedgwick. Most recently, you can catch Lynn guest starring on HBO's "Silicon Valley" and hosting numerous BuzzFeed videos, which have reached over 20 million views.

In 2013, Marie Claire Magazine called Lynn one of The New Change Agents. She is a Spokesperson for the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) as well as Skype's Acting Ambassador. In addition to running two award-winning blogs (The Actor's Diet and Thick Dumpling Skin) Lynn is a writer, most recently published in LA Weekly. Find her on her blogs or at LynnChen.com.

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