politics

Food Psych #86: Body Positivity & Social Justice with Dianne Bondy

Dianne Bondy - Yoga Teacher & Body Image Activist

Yoga teacher and body-positive activist Dianne Bondy shares how a body-shaming father led her to develop an eating disorder in childhood and adolescence, how yoga helped in her recovery, why the yoga industry needs to be more welcoming of all bodies, why body positivity is a social justice issue, and lots more! 

Dianne Bondy is a celebrated yoga teacher, social justice activist and leading voice of the Yoga For All movement. Her inclusive view of yoga asana and philosophy inspires and empowers thousands of followers around the world – regardless of their shape, size, ethnicity, or level of ability.

Dianne contributes to Yoga International, Do You Yoga, and Elephant Journal. She is featured and profiled in International media outlets: The Guardian, Huffington Post, Cosmopolitan, People and more. She is a spokesperson for diversity in yoga and yoga for larger bodies, as seen in her work with Pennington’s, Gaiam, and the Yoga & Body Image Coalition. Her work is published in the books Yoga and Body Image, and Yes Yoga Has Curves. Find her online at DianneBondyYoga.com and YogaSteya.com.

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We Discuss:

  • Dianne’s relationship with food growing up, including a contentious relationship with her father that twisted food into a negative experience, and her exposure to eating disorder treatment in the early 1980s

  • How pervasive the messaging is around women’s bodies, and how we are frequently told we are not good enough

  • Dianne’s conflicts around being a yogi and someone in recovery from an eating disorder in relation to vegansim and vegetarianism

  • The ways in which yoga can feel dogmatic and triggering when practiced in a diet framework

  • Why we must put self-care, self-love, and our own needs first when certain ideologies may put our recovery or safety in jeopardy

  • Why the classic aesthetic of yoga (white, able-bodied, thin, woman) is so damaging to those who do not fit within the cultural ideal

  • Diet culture’s sneaky hiding places, and the ways in which the diet mentality is just a product of the capitalist machine

  • The pervasiveness of fatphobia within the medical community

  • The importance of educating people on Health at Every Size and true body positivity

  • Dianne’s a-ha moment in her eating disorder recovery, including the big part that yoga played in recovery

  • Dianne’s journey to find yoga for all bodies

  • The co-option of the body positivity movement, how frustrating it is to live in a world that tries to bar all bodies from healing practices such as yoga, and the ways in which we can use true body positivity to fight against the diet mentality

  • The ways in which diet culture acts as tool of the patriarchy and limits women in their political and cultural power

  • Dianne’s vision for the downfall of the diet industry, and the amazing work being done in the social justice community to push back against diet culture

  • The power in embracing self-love and self-healing

  • Why social media is helping in the fight against diet culture

  • Body positivity and size acceptance as a social and political movement, and how pushback indicates progress

  • HAES as a civil rights movement

  • Dianne’s experience with the 2016 U.S. election as a Canadian

  • Millennial hate, the impact of Baby Boomer policy, and the ways in which the American experience has paved the way for a hateful, bigoted ideology

  • The impossibility of the young, white beauty ideal and its oppressive impacts

  • Oppression, white supremacy, and the ways in which the world is simultaneously changing and regressing

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #85: How to Escape Diet Prison with Anne-Sophie Reinhardt

Anne-Sophie Reinhardt - Escape Diet Prison

Anti-diet coach Anne-Sophie Reinhardt shares why she turned to food for comfort in childhood, how she quickly spiraled from dieting to an eating disorder in adolescence, why "willpower" isn't actually a good thing, how she discovered the body-postive movement and healed her relationship with food, why trauma is such a trigger for disordered eating behaviors, and lots more. 

Anne-Sophie Reinhardt is an anti-diet coach and body confidence expert who wants you to know one thing: your weight does NOT determine your worth. A firm believer that you don’t (and shouldn’t) have to wait to start living because of your weight, Anne-Sophie works with women around the globe to help them escape diet prison and make eating fun again (because life is a lot more delicious when food doesn’t rule your life). 

Now a Certified Eating Psychology Coach and Martha Beck Life Coach, Anne-Sophie struggled with disordered eating, yo-yo dieting and bingeing and purging for over 14 years. After a serious health scare, Anne-Sophie entered recovery and launched her own recovery-focused blog, later named one of the Best 25 Personal Growth Blogs 2015 by the Institute for the Psychology of Eating. Since then, she’s helped countless clients write new rules around food, self love, body image and life in general and has shared her revolutionary anti-diet message in top publications like She Takes on the World, Tiny Buddha and Huffington Post.

And when Anne-Sophie’s not helping clients fall madly in love with their own bodies (and lives) you’ll likely find her enjoying her own by devouring a delicious book, swimming with adorable her son, savoring a massive ice cream cone (sans guilt) or (most likely) catching up on old episodes of Grey’s Anatomy. Join her Escape Diet Prison Tribe and her free Facebook group.

 

We Discuss:

  • The ways in which diets are now marketed as “lifestyle changes,” which makes it that much harder to be aware of the diet mentality and to not get sucked back into diet culture

  • Anne-Sophie’s relationship to food growing up, including the feeling of unease around food from a young age and the ways in which she used food to feel in control of and cope with an abusive experience

  • The ways in which trauma can trigger eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors as a way to cope with difficult circumstances

  • The impact of Trump's abusive rhetoric towards women, and how triggering his words and sentiments can be to survivors of abuse

  • Anne-Sophie’s experience with feeling shame over the size of her body, and how that shame led to excessive exercise and food restriction

  • How positive reinforcement of extreme weight loss, especially by encouraging the concept of “willpower,” can push disordered eating into eating disorder territory

  • Anne-Sophie’s experience with anorexia, including her abandonment of all creative pursuits and hobbies in favor of an obsessive relationship with food and her body

  • Her first steps to find healing and recovery from her eating disorder, including her experience with therapy and in-patient treatment

  • The deep need for more education about eating disorders within the medical and clinical communities, including the life-threatening element of eating disorders and the understanding that eating disorders are severe in all cases whether or not they physically present as such

  • Why many families are in denial about the signs of an eating disorder, and why it's important to encourage the family not to dismiss these red-flag moments

  • Anne-Sophie’s first exposure to self-care in her recovery journey, and why it was essential to learn to value her body for things other than weight

  • Her experience with intensive therapy, and how it encouraged her to find her self-worth and explore the emotional components of her eating-disorder behaviors

  • The ways in which recovery opens us back up to our lives, including our creativity and valuable relationships

  • The importance of baby steps in recovery, and the reality that recovery is a struggle

  • Anne-Sophie’s use of gratitude and journaling to bolster her recovery

  • Anne-Sophie’s experience getting pregnant, the challenges that came along with that weight gain, and the ultimately fulfilling experience of having a body healthy enough to create a life

  • The important development of body trust in eating disorder recovery to support intuitive eating

  • How watching a child’s relationship with food and movement, which is filled with ease, can have a profound impact on how we view our own relationships to food and movement

  • Anne-Sophie’s transition to being an anti-diet coach, including how she began with blogging and podcasting her journey and then eventually made her way her way getting her certifications in coaching

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Food Psych #81: How to Honor Your Body and Recover from Disordered Eating with Rachel Cole

Rachel Cole - Body Image & Eating Disorder Recovery Coach

Body image coach Rachel Cole shares why we lose touch with our bodies in times of distress, how to start coming back into embodiment, why the 2016 election has caused so much pain for people struggling with food and body issues, how she recovered from eating disorders and embraced body positivity, why feminism and social justice are so integral to making peace with food and your body, and lots more!

“True body positivity is a political movement.” [Click to Tweet]

Rachel Cole is a certified life coach, celebrated teacher, and women’s empowerment expert. She has spent ten years guiding women to identify, understand and feed their truest hungers – at and away from the table. As an eating disorder survivor herself, Rachel speaks with great wisdom, sensitivity, and authority about what it takes to live as a well-fed woman in the modern world. She has traveled across the United States and internationally speaking and teaching to sold-out gatherings of women on how they too can find ease and fulfillment in their lives simply by honoring their own hungers. Rachel holds a Masters Degree in Holistic Health Education and is a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach. Find her online at RachelWCole.com, and read her full blog post, "Stay."

 

We Discuss:

  • The importance of body politics in the body image discussion, including some of the systemic issues that feed into our relationships to our bodies

  • The value in staying present in our bodies when we are faced with difficult feelings, including eating disorder thoughts

  • The struggles many of us face with embodiment, including the reasons we leave our bodies in times of distress and how living in the body of a woman can be particularly difficult

  • How objectification takes agency away from those of us trying to experience embodiment

  • Ways in which we can engage in purposeful embodiment in a curious, non-judgmental way

  • The importance of balancing self-care with intentional engagement

  • How confusing it can be as a person in a helping profession during this turbulent cultural period, and the difficulty of watching clients engage with their own oppression

  • Rachel’s relationship with food and her body growing up, including her eating disorder history and how important getting angry at the systemic issues that feed into eating disorder development was in finding her eating disorder recovery

  • How a parent’s relationship with food and their bodies can impact their children's body image and relationship with food

  • The double-edged sword of exposing diet culture and diving into the body-positive world, including the pro of deprogramming our minds from the diet mindset, but the con of seeing fat shaming, negative body talk, and disordered eating everywhere we go

  • How important it is to remember that the honeymoon phase of intuitive eating eventually ends, and that getting back in touch with our hunger and fullness cues is a long, difficult, but integral part of the eating disorder recovery process

  • The ways in which letting go of weight management is such a big step towards intuitive eating and true eating disorder recovery

  • Rachel’s experience in graduate school, including her transition into orthorexia

  • How seemingly innocuous comments from peers can feed into our perception of ourselves as “healthy” eaters, and can continue to push us towards disordered eating

  • The difficulty of navigating our own relationships with food in relation to other people's behaviors around food, and dealing with the silent judgment when everyone around you is engaging in a restrictive lifestyle

  • Rachel’s journey to her role as life coach focusing on HAES, intuitive eating, and eating disorder recovery

  • The deep need in the nutrition community for more HAES voices

 

"If you can mess it up, it's a diet." [Click to Tweet]

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #79: Intuitive Eating & the Satisfaction Factor with Elyse Resch

Elyse Resch - Intuitive Eating Workbook

Intuitive Eating co-author Elyse Resch shares her history of emotional eating as a child, how going on a diet in her 20s triggered an eating disorder, why studying nutrition science and becoming a dietitian helped her recover, how she got the idea to write an anti-diet book, why satisfaction is so central to intuitive eating, how to raise kids as intuitive eaters, and lots more!  

Elyse Resch, MS, RDN, CEDRD has been in private practice in Beverly Hills as a Nutrition Therapist for 34 years, specializing in eating disorders, Intuitive Eating, and preventative nutrition. She is the co-author of Intuitive Eating (St. Martin's Press, 1995, 1996, 2003, third edition--2012), and is the co-author of Intuitive Eating, audio version, 2009 (Sounds True). She has published journal articles and does regular speaking engagements and extensive press, radio, and internet interviews. She is nationally known for her work in helping patients break free from the diet mentality through the Intuitive Eating process.

Elyse's philosophy embraces the goal of reconnecting with your internal wisdom about eating.  This is the wisdom with which you were born but from which you have become distracted. A reconnection with your intuitive wisdom will help you develop a healthy and satisfying relationship with food and your body. Elyse’s work has been profiled on CNN, KABC, NBC, AP Press, and KTTV television. She is a certified child and adolescent obesity expert, a Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian, and a Fellow of the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals. She was also the treatment team nutritionist on the Eating Disorder Unit at Beverly Hills Medical Center. Find her online at ElyseResch.com, and pre-order her Intuitive Eating Workbook.

 

We Discuss:

  • Reflections on the election, and validating any and all of our difficult, confusing feelings

  • Elyse’s relationship with food growing up, including a generally neutral relationship to food as a child that eventually developed into an eating disorder due to outside influences from peers and loved ones later in life

  • Elyse’s experience in graduate school and how it helped her in her eating disorder recovery

  • How Elyse’s clients’ experiences with weight regain and her exploration of food and psychology prompted a shift to explore weight-neutral nutrition and Health at Every Size (HAES)

  • Christy and Elyse’s reflections on being a part of diet culture at one time in their careers, and how to help nutritionists and dietitians embrace HAES and intuitive eating and let go of the diet mentality

  • Elyse’s approach to advocating for ourselves in the doctor’s office to ensure a non-triggering visit for those in eating disorder recovery

  • The book Intuitive Eating and the concepts of rejecting the diet mentality, understanding diet culture, and letting go of the dream of weight loss

  • Elyse’s experience being an intuitive eating nutritionist in Hollywood, where image is so important and clients are often urged to be underweight

  • How removing magazines and other forms of body-focused media is an important step in removing eating disorder and negative body-image triggers

  • Elyse’s supervision work with counselors training for the Intuitive Eating Certification, including confronting weight bias and diet mentality among professionals

  • Radical acceptance and self-compassion in eating disorder recovery

  • The importance of confronting our own mental health struggles when we decide to enter a field such as counseling that requires us to delve into the mental health of others

  • Raising children as intuitive eaters, including empowering children in their own autonomy and engendering trust to promote food intuition

  • The gray area that is intuitive eating, including the importance of intention rather than perfection

  • Elyse’s evolving relationship with perfectionism, which eventually led to the idea that falling back into diet behavior is never “wrong,” but rather an opportunity to learn and grow

  • The pros and cons of social media, including the issue of comparison and promoting only the best moments of our lives, as well as changing your feed to remove triggering material

  • The new Intuitive Eating Workbook, including how important exercises can be to such a theoretical practice

  • How important satisfaction is in the eating experience, and how we can think about satisfaction as a gentle way into intuitive eating

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #78: Healing Trauma & Learning Intuitive Movement with Lauren Ezell Minear

Lauren Ezell Minear - Healing Trauma & Learning Intuitive Exercise

Therapist and yoga instructor Lauren Ezell Minear shares why embodiment is so important to healing from trauma, how feminism and yoga helped her recover from an eating disorder, how she's learned to listen to her body's cues for movement and rest, and lots more. Plus, Christy shares an aspect of her story publicly for the first time.

Lauren Ezell Minear is a psychotherapist and yoga instructor with a private practice in New York City. She specializes in the treatment of eating and body image problems from a feminist relational perspective grounded in mindfulness-based interventions. Lauren also offers integrative body image workshops and yoga therapy for anxiety, depression, exercise compulsion, and traumatic stress. She is the creator of InBodied Yoga®, a body-positive method of movement as self-care. Find her online at LaurenMinear.com.

 

We Discuss:

  • Christy’s reflections on the Be Nourished retreat, including the concept of body trust and experiencing the results of the 2016 Presidential election within a body-positive support network

  • How to heal from trauma of this kind, including holding space for all of our feelings and avoiding turning towards eating disorder behaviors and dieting for relief from the discomfort

  • Lauren’s relationship with food growing up, including the shift in weight related to puberty, her early understanding that women were “supposed” to be small, and the cultural expectations of women in the South

  • Lauren’s early experiences navigating her femininity, including the perception of having to make a choice between owning her power and intelligence, and being a “proper” feminine woman 

  • How perfectionism can feed into eating disorder behaviors, and Lauren’s first experience with restriction and the positive reinforcement that came with weight loss

  • Lauren’s journey from her own eating disorder, to navigating eating disorder recovery, to finally becoming a therapist who works with people struggling with eating disorders

  • The intervention that Lauren had early on in relation to her eating disorder recovery, including her supportive family and other concerned people in her life who took notice of her physical changes and overall anxiety

  • Lauren’s transition from restriction to bulimia in college after her first attempt at recovery, and her final steps toward true recovery when she moved to New York City and found the right therapist

  • How the constant pursuit of thinness and clean eating take energy away from important creativity and other professional and personal pursuits

  • The difficulty of exercise within eating disorder recovery, including Lauren and Christy’s positive and also sometimes triggering or negative experiences with yoga

  • The limiting framework of the current commercialized version of yoga, including the lack of ethnic and size diversity, and some of the yoga community’s limited and sometimes damaging ideas about food and the body rooted in diet culture

  • The importance of getting out of the way of our body’s natural drive to heal itself

  • Intuitive movement, including Lauren’s experience as a yoga teacher and her practice of yoga therapy, as well as how flexible intuitive movement really can be

  • The importance of giving the body rest after trauma, including Lauren’s experience using yoga to heal from trauma and her experience focusing on trauma as a psychotherapist

  • Christy’s experience with trauma therapy and PTSD, including how eating disorder recovery can cloud other things going on internally and the shame related to trauma that often prevents people from seeking treatment

  • How eating disorders often function as important coping mechanisms before people can learn new, healthy coping skills

  • The synthesizing of eating disorder recovery, yoga, feminism, size acceptance, body positivity, HAES, and so much more

  • Lauren’s experience in the social-work field and earning her yoga training certification, including how she came to a feminist relational perspective and embodiment

  • The difficulty of doing the body image work in the eating disorder recovery field, including the importance of clinicians doing their own body image and HAES work

 

Resources Mentioned

Some of the links below are affiliate links. Affiliates or not, we only recommend products and services that align with our values.

 

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