be nourished

Food Psych #90: Raising Kids with Body Trust and Intuitive Eating with Hilary Kinavey of Be Nourished

Hilary Kinavey

Psychotherapist and HAES activist Hilary Kinavey shares her history of chronic dieting, the role of feminism in her recovery, how she helps her kids develop a healthy relationship with food, how romantic relationships affected her body image, why there need to be more body-positive role models for navigating aging and body changes throughout life, and lots more!  

Hilary Kinavey, MS, LPC, is a licensed professional counselor and cofounder of Be Nourished, LLC. Her work encourages movement toward a radically compassionate model of healing to address internalized body shame and associated patterns of chronic dieting and disordered eating. She is the co-creator of Body Trust™ Wellness, a Certified Daring Way™ facilitator-candidate, and a transformational workshop leader. Hilary is a popular speaker on topics such as Health at Every Size®, intuitive eating, and body respect in health care communities, and a regular contributor to the Huffington Post. Find her online at BeNourished.org.

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We Discuss:

  • Hilary’s relationship to food growing up, including navigating conflicting messages around food and her body

  • The relationship between feminism, dieting, and diet culture, and the way in which diets are marketed as a means of power and control to powerful women

  • Hilary’s diagnosis of PCOS, and how it impacted her relationship with food and her body

  • The natural health and naturopathic perspective, and the ways many of the natural health recommendations are just more diets in disguise

  • How when we heal our relationship with food we can approach health from a place of self-care rather than self-control

  • The current medical model that equates weight and health, and the need for Health at Every Size education within the medical community

  • How irresponsible and unethical it is to suggest weight loss for health when the research shows that it is nearly impossible to maintain, and how fuzzy the research on “obesity” even is

  • The ways in which letting go of dieting and moving to intuitive eating can trigger a mourning process

  • How our culture yearns for authenticity and human connection, how dieting prevents this connection, and how the HAES and body-positive community allows room for authenticity and letting go of shame

  • How powerful it can be when we let go of dieting, find our voices, and find our power

  • Hilary’s introduction to intuitive eating, including her experience with a therapist who helped her reconnect with food and her body

  • Hilary’s shifting relationship with her family due to her own identity within the anti-diet movement versus their identity within diet culture

  • The difficulty of engaging with people who are still indoctrinated in diet culture when you yourself have emerged from the dynamic

  • A parent’s role in the development of a child’s body image, including the importance of not commenting on bodies in any capacity around children in order to foster positive or neutral body image

  • Raising children in a body-neutral environment, and how to navigate teaching children HAES while also dealing with differing perspectives in other institutions such as school

  • Interfering as a parent in schools that teach potentially triggering behavior in the name of health

  • The eating competence model and Ellyn Satter’s work

  • Relationships and body image, including the realization that the connection with our partner has little to do with the way our bodies look

  • Hilary’s relationship with her body during and after pregnancy, including her difficulty reclaiming her sexuality

  • The need for female role models who exemplify unabashed ownership of their own body, especially in terms of unapologetic sexuality within female aging

  • Hilary’s experience as a mother and businessowner, and how her relationship with her body and herself has been challenged

  • How “letting go” is a lifelong process, from eating disorders to business dynamics

  • The importance of moving out of our heads and into our bodies

  • The concept of body trust, and the need for clinicians to be trained in body trust for eating disorder recovery and letting go of chronic dieting

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #78: Healing Trauma & Learning Intuitive Movement with Lauren Ezell Minear

Lauren Ezell Minear - Healing Trauma & Learning Intuitive Exercise

Therapist and yoga instructor Lauren Ezell Minear shares why embodiment is so important to healing from trauma, how feminism and yoga helped her recover from an eating disorder, how she's learned to listen to her body's cues for movement and rest, and lots more. Plus, Christy shares an aspect of her story publicly for the first time.

Lauren Ezell Minear is a psychotherapist and yoga instructor with a private practice in New York City. She specializes in the treatment of eating and body image problems from a feminist relational perspective grounded in mindfulness-based interventions. Lauren also offers integrative body image workshops and yoga therapy for anxiety, depression, exercise compulsion, and traumatic stress. She is the creator of InBodied Yoga®, a body-positive method of movement as self-care. Find her online at LaurenMinear.com.

 

We Discuss:

  • Christy’s reflections on the Be Nourished retreat, including the concept of body trust and experiencing the results of the 2016 Presidential election within a body-positive support network

  • How to heal from trauma of this kind, including holding space for all of our feelings and avoiding turning towards eating disorder behaviors and dieting for relief from the discomfort

  • Lauren’s relationship with food growing up, including the shift in weight related to puberty, her early understanding that women were “supposed” to be small, and the cultural expectations of women in the South

  • Lauren’s early experiences navigating her femininity, including the perception of having to make a choice between owning her power and intelligence, and being a “proper” feminine woman 

  • How perfectionism can feed into eating disorder behaviors, and Lauren’s first experience with restriction and the positive reinforcement that came with weight loss

  • Lauren’s journey from her own eating disorder, to navigating eating disorder recovery, to finally becoming a therapist who works with people struggling with eating disorders

  • The intervention that Lauren had early on in relation to her eating disorder recovery, including her supportive family and other concerned people in her life who took notice of her physical changes and overall anxiety

  • Lauren’s transition from restriction to bulimia in college after her first attempt at recovery, and her final steps toward true recovery when she moved to New York City and found the right therapist

  • How the constant pursuit of thinness and clean eating take energy away from important creativity and other professional and personal pursuits

  • The difficulty of exercise within eating disorder recovery, including Lauren and Christy’s positive and also sometimes triggering or negative experiences with yoga

  • The limiting framework of the current commercialized version of yoga, including the lack of ethnic and size diversity, and some of the yoga community’s limited and sometimes damaging ideas about food and the body rooted in diet culture

  • The importance of getting out of the way of our body’s natural drive to heal itself

  • Intuitive movement, including Lauren’s experience as a yoga teacher and her practice of yoga therapy, as well as how flexible intuitive movement really can be

  • The importance of giving the body rest after trauma, including Lauren’s experience using yoga to heal from trauma and her experience focusing on trauma as a psychotherapist

  • Christy’s experience with trauma therapy and PTSD, including how eating disorder recovery can cloud other things going on internally and the shame related to trauma that often prevents people from seeking treatment

  • How eating disorders often function as important coping mechanisms before people can learn new, healthy coping skills

  • The synthesizing of eating disorder recovery, yoga, feminism, size acceptance, body positivity, HAES, and so much more

  • Lauren’s experience in the social-work field and earning her yoga training certification, including how she came to a feminist relational perspective and embodiment

  • The difficulty of doing the body image work in the eating disorder recovery field, including the importance of clinicians doing their own body image and HAES work

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #76: Body Trust and Competent Eating vs. "Healthy" Eating with Dana Sturtevant of Be Nourished

Dana Sturtevant of Be Nourished

Dana Sturtevant—co-founder of the Be Nourished wellness center in Portland, OR—shares how her desire to be thinner manifested as a child, how a vegetarian friend introduced her to the idea of nutrition, how she began her career as a dietitian in the traditional "weight management" paradigm, what drew her to the Health at Every Size approach, and lots more! 

Dana Sturtevant, MS, RD, is a trainer, mentor, Kripalu Yoga teacher, and dietitian specializing in Health at Every Size® and intuitive eating. She is the cofounder of Be Nourished, a revolutionary business helping people heal body dissatisfaction and reclaim body trust. Dana loves incorporating mindfulness and self-compassion practices into her work. A member of the International Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers, Dana has facilitated more than 300 workshops throughout the United States for health care providers looking to enhance their skills in behavior-change counseling. Her work has been featured in the Huffington Post. Find her online at BeNourished.com

 

We Discuss:

  • Dana’s relationship with food growing up, including the birth of consciousness related to beauty standards and her first experience with body shame and self-restriction

  • How the restrictive messages around food and beliefs about the body reach young children in insidious ways

  • Why food control is a method of emotional coping, rather than just about controlling the body

  • The complicated relationship that women in particular have with their bodies when they enter adulthood, and how the mental energy surrounding body control makes it that much harder for young women to discover their identity

  • Female sexuality, the double standard for women, and the drive to be wanted for our bodies

  • The intersections of feminism and eating disorders, and the impacts of patriarchy on both men and women

  • How the diet industry is shifting, pushing the healthy ideal and changing the focus to the untapped male market

  • The difficulty of addressing orthorexia in dietetics and nutrition practice due to the conflation of health and size

  • Navigating intuitive eating from Dana’s young adulthood and into her current practice, including the concept of pleasure versus nutrition and the introduction of mindfulness

  • Dana’s introduction to nutrition, which began as an exploration into a vegetarian lifestyle

  • Intentionally incorporating the ethics related to food choice while also holding onto strong recovery, and how to make food choices from a place of groundedness versus shame

  • How our reputation and identity can often be heavily tied to our food choices

  • Dana’s transition from weight management to Health at Every Size (HAES) and intuitive eating

  • The ways helpful practices, such as mindfulness and intuitive eating, get co-opted by diet culture and are turned into weight loss and weight management programs

  • How deprivation and restriction can be entirely mental and not seem to manifest in behaviors, but can still bounce back into responsive bingeing behaviors

  • The difference between feeling full and feeling satisfied

  • Nutrition’s place in intuitive eating, including how to make nutrition your ally rather than your opponent in your recovery

  • The work that needs to be done to unlearn weight bias and diet culture

 

Resources Mentioned

Some of the links below are affiliate links. Affiliates or not, we only recommend products and services that align with our values.

 

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