body trust

Food Psych #98: How to Rediscover the Joy in Food and Movement with Kylie Mitchell

Kylie Mitchell

Food blogger and fellow anti-diet dietitian Kylie Mitchell shares how she overcame dieting, disordered eating, and compulsive exercise; why she wanted to start a food blog that celebrates food and eschews the orthorexic messages of other "wellness" blogs; the insidious ways in which diet culture is woven into the fabric of how we talk about food and health; why non-diet approaches like Health at Every Size and intuitive eating are important for *everyone* of *every* body size; how she improved her relationship with movement and let go of compulsive exercise; what the transition from an eating disorder into intuitive eating looks like; and lots more!

Kylie Mitchell is a Registered Dietitian with a Masters of Public Health. She is the founder of the food/lifestyle blog immaEATthat.com, which she started six years ago in an effort to stop disordered eating and help people fall back in love with a healthful relationship with food and their body. Kylie works to promote positive body image, intuitive eating and Health at Every Size. Kylie also specializes in creative recipe development and high-res food photography. When not behind the computer or camera, Kylie works as an eating disorder dietitian. Kylie lives in Houston, TX with her husband and puppy, where she likes to over-share on Instagram. Find her online at immaEATthat.com.

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We Discuss:

  • Kylie’s relationship with food growing up, including living in a household obsessed with dieting and the thin ideal

  • Body trust and the pregnancy experience

  • Eating disorders and disordered eating as coping mechanisms

  • Kylie’s experience with restriction, binge eating, and overexercising to compensate for bingeing behavior

  • The lack of Health at Every Size and intuitive eating instruction in dietetics and nutrition education

  • Disordered eating within the nutrition and dietetics field

  • The spectrum of eating behavior

  • Diet culture, the diet mentality, and how our world perpetuates disordered eating

  • The importance of non-diet, intuitive eating, and HAES resources in recovery from eating disorders and diet culture

  • Kylie’s work on her blog, how it started from a disordered and obsessional place, and how it eventually became a place of healing and recovery

  • “Healthy” food blogging and orthorexia

  • The responsibility that all dietitians have to show that all foods fit and the ways in which they often fall short

  • Breaking down the morality around food choices

  • Making peace with movement and finding a body-positive, weight-neutral movement practice

  • The role of yoga in Kylie’s eating disorder recovery and finding embodiment

  • Body dissatisfaction, fatphobia, and finding body acceptance

  • Navigating relationships in recovery and seeking outside support when we need it

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #96: How to Trust Your Body & Honor Its Wisdom with Tracy Brown

Tracy Brown RD

Fellow Health at Every Size dietitian Tracy Brown shares why she started dieting and fighting her body in adolescence, how restriction quickly spiraled into an eating disorder, why difficulty with setting boundaries played into her relationship with food, how she found her way to recovery and started down the path to becoming a dietitian, how she began to tune in to her body's wisdom and practice intuitive eating, why she dove into practicing from a Health at Every Size paradigm, and lots more. She also leads us in a special meditation for helping reconnect to your body!

Tracy Brown is a somatic nutrition therapist, registered dietitian, and attuned eating coach in private practice providing in-person, phone and online counseling since 2006. Tracy works with people on a soul level because she believes not wanting to be in the body is a way of protecting oneself, so her work is about nourishing the nervous system to feel safe enough to feel emotion and actually heal. She specializes in the treatment of eating disorders and eating problems for both adults and children, as well as issues related to overextending the body, including adrenal fatigue, hormone issues, PCOS and gut health.

Tracy routinely teaches intuitive eating workshops and disordered-eating-related talks throughout Florida, including at the University of Florida and Santa Fe College in Gainesville, FL; Flager College; and Florida Gulf Coast University in Ft Myers. She is also the guest Nutrition Therapist for Feast, an online intuitive eating program run by past Food Psych guest Rachel Cole. Tracy has appeared on many podcasts discussing topics including intuitive eating, trauma healing, positive body image, and recovery.

She believes that healing food and weight concerns is really about deciding to embrace our humanity in the diverse and amazing bodies we have. Living and feeling fully with courage and being dedicated to the fullest expression of who we are is the point. Learn more about Tracy and her work at TracyBrownRD.com.

This episode is brought to you by Plum Deluxe, a Fair Trade tea company that's committed to fostering mindfulness, compassion, and community. 

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We Discuss:

  • Tracy’s relationship with food growing up, including a childhood that included farming and exposure to sports at an early age

  • Tracy’s experience with subliminal messages about “acceptable” body size

  • The emotions attached to the dieting experience

  • How dating and socializing impacted Tracy’s ideas of perfection and her understanding of what is valued in our society

  • Tracy’s first experience with a diet and the resulting spiral into disordered eating, restriction, obsessive exercise, and anorexia

  • How eating disorders can be used to create boundaries around us and isolate us from the world

  • Rape culture and consent in the context of bodily autonomy

  • The relationship between eating disorders and control

  • Tracy’s journey through early eating disorder recovery and her introduction to intuitive eating

  • Tracy’s experience in college studying dietetics and nutrition, including studying with the knowledge that she would be following an anti-diet path once she received her degree

  • The impact of deprivation on the restrict-binge cycle

  • How the diet mentality and mental restriction impact the ability to break the binge cycle

  • Tracy’s trials and tribulations trying to find a job in dietetics, and her eventual first supervision under the guidance of an intuitive eating practitioner

  • Tracy’s experience with self-experimentation in learning her own hunger and fullness

  • The role of therapy in eating disorder recovery and intuitive eating

  • Tracy’s transition into private practice and Health at Every Size work, including her frustration with the diet model in mainstream dietetics

  • The challenge that HAES clinicians face in making space for their client’s mourning process around letting go of weight loss

  • Letting go of the instinct to fix problems rather than feel problems

  • How diet culture and fatphobia impact people of all sizes

  • The role of the HAES, body-positive community in supporting people when they doubt the truth about diet culture

  • How nonlinear the recovery and intuitive eating process can be

  • The judgment and moral values we attach to food behaviors

  • Tracy’s use of somatics and meditation to support eating disorder recovery, body acceptance, and inner wisdom

  • How to prepare clients for the diet culture of the outside world and create boundaries around their own process

  • How meditation can help ground the body, center the self, and foster self-compassion

  • How to have gratitude for coping mechanisms that no longer serve us

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #90: Raising Kids with Body Trust and Intuitive Eating with Hilary Kinavey of Be Nourished

Hilary Kinavey

Psychotherapist and HAES activist Hilary Kinavey shares her history of chronic dieting, the role of feminism in her recovery, how she helps her kids develop a healthy relationship with food, how romantic relationships affected her body image, why there need to be more body-positive role models for navigating aging and body changes throughout life, and lots more!  

Hilary Kinavey, MS, LPC, is a licensed professional counselor and cofounder of Be Nourished, LLC. Her work encourages movement toward a radically compassionate model of healing to address internalized body shame and associated patterns of chronic dieting and disordered eating. She is the co-creator of Body Trust™ Wellness, a Certified Daring Way™ facilitator-candidate, and a transformational workshop leader. Hilary is a popular speaker on topics such as Health at Every Size®, intuitive eating, and body respect in health care communities, and a regular contributor to the Huffington Post. Find her online at BeNourished.org.

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We Discuss:

  • Hilary’s relationship to food growing up, including navigating conflicting messages around food and her body

  • The relationship between feminism, dieting, and diet culture, and the way in which diets are marketed as a means of power and control to powerful women

  • Hilary’s diagnosis of PCOS, and how it impacted her relationship with food and her body

  • The natural health and naturopathic perspective, and the ways many of the natural health recommendations are just more diets in disguise

  • How when we heal our relationship with food we can approach health from a place of self-care rather than self-control

  • The current medical model that equates weight and health, and the need for Health at Every Size education within the medical community

  • How irresponsible and unethical it is to suggest weight loss for health when the research shows that it is nearly impossible to maintain, and how fuzzy the research on “obesity” even is

  • The ways in which letting go of dieting and moving to intuitive eating can trigger a mourning process

  • How our culture yearns for authenticity and human connection, how dieting prevents this connection, and how the HAES and body-positive community allows room for authenticity and letting go of shame

  • How powerful it can be when we let go of dieting, find our voices, and find our power

  • Hilary’s introduction to intuitive eating, including her experience with a therapist who helped her reconnect with food and her body

  • Hilary’s shifting relationship with her family due to her own identity within the anti-diet movement versus their identity within diet culture

  • The difficulty of engaging with people who are still indoctrinated in diet culture when you yourself have emerged from the dynamic

  • A parent’s role in the development of a child’s body image, including the importance of not commenting on bodies in any capacity around children in order to foster positive or neutral body image

  • Raising children in a body-neutral environment, and how to navigate teaching children HAES while also dealing with differing perspectives in other institutions such as school

  • Interfering as a parent in schools that teach potentially triggering behavior in the name of health

  • The eating competence model and Ellyn Satter’s work

  • Relationships and body image, including the realization that the connection with our partner has little to do with the way our bodies look

  • Hilary’s relationship with her body during and after pregnancy, including her difficulty reclaiming her sexuality

  • The need for female role models who exemplify unabashed ownership of their own body, especially in terms of unapologetic sexuality within female aging

  • Hilary’s experience as a mother and businessowner, and how her relationship with her body and herself has been challenged

  • How “letting go” is a lifelong process, from eating disorders to business dynamics

  • The importance of moving out of our heads and into our bodies

  • The concept of body trust, and the need for clinicians to be trained in body trust for eating disorder recovery and letting go of chronic dieting

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #85: How to Escape Diet Prison with Anne-Sophie Reinhardt

Anne-Sophie Reinhardt - Escape Diet Prison

Anti-diet coach Anne-Sophie Reinhardt shares why she turned to food for comfort in childhood, how she quickly spiraled from dieting to an eating disorder in adolescence, why "willpower" isn't actually a good thing, how she discovered the body-postive movement and healed her relationship with food, why trauma is such a trigger for disordered eating behaviors, and lots more. 

Anne-Sophie Reinhardt is an anti-diet coach and body confidence expert who wants you to know one thing: your weight does NOT determine your worth. A firm believer that you don’t (and shouldn’t) have to wait to start living because of your weight, Anne-Sophie works with women around the globe to help them escape diet prison and make eating fun again (because life is a lot more delicious when food doesn’t rule your life). 

Now a Certified Eating Psychology Coach and Martha Beck Life Coach, Anne-Sophie struggled with disordered eating, yo-yo dieting and bingeing and purging for over 14 years. After a serious health scare, Anne-Sophie entered recovery and launched her own recovery-focused blog, later named one of the Best 25 Personal Growth Blogs 2015 by the Institute for the Psychology of Eating. Since then, she’s helped countless clients write new rules around food, self love, body image and life in general and has shared her revolutionary anti-diet message in top publications like She Takes on the World, Tiny Buddha and Huffington Post.

And when Anne-Sophie’s not helping clients fall madly in love with their own bodies (and lives) you’ll likely find her enjoying her own by devouring a delicious book, swimming with adorable her son, savoring a massive ice cream cone (sans guilt) or (most likely) catching up on old episodes of Grey’s Anatomy. Join her Escape Diet Prison Tribe and her free Facebook group.

 

We Discuss:

  • The ways in which diets are now marketed as “lifestyle changes,” which makes it that much harder to be aware of the diet mentality and to not get sucked back into diet culture

  • Anne-Sophie’s relationship to food growing up, including the feeling of unease around food from a young age and the ways in which she used food to feel in control of and cope with an abusive experience

  • The ways in which trauma can trigger eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors as a way to cope with difficult circumstances

  • The impact of Trump's abusive rhetoric towards women, and how triggering his words and sentiments can be to survivors of abuse

  • Anne-Sophie’s experience with feeling shame over the size of her body, and how that shame led to excessive exercise and food restriction

  • How positive reinforcement of extreme weight loss, especially by encouraging the concept of “willpower,” can push disordered eating into eating disorder territory

  • Anne-Sophie’s experience with anorexia, including her abandonment of all creative pursuits and hobbies in favor of an obsessive relationship with food and her body

  • Her first steps to find healing and recovery from her eating disorder, including her experience with therapy and in-patient treatment

  • The deep need for more education about eating disorders within the medical and clinical communities, including the life-threatening element of eating disorders and the understanding that eating disorders are severe in all cases whether or not they physically present as such

  • Why many families are in denial about the signs of an eating disorder, and why it's important to encourage the family not to dismiss these red-flag moments

  • Anne-Sophie’s first exposure to self-care in her recovery journey, and why it was essential to learn to value her body for things other than weight

  • Her experience with intensive therapy, and how it encouraged her to find her self-worth and explore the emotional components of her eating-disorder behaviors

  • The ways in which recovery opens us back up to our lives, including our creativity and valuable relationships

  • The importance of baby steps in recovery, and the reality that recovery is a struggle

  • Anne-Sophie’s use of gratitude and journaling to bolster her recovery

  • Anne-Sophie’s experience getting pregnant, the challenges that came along with that weight gain, and the ultimately fulfilling experience of having a body healthy enough to create a life

  • The important development of body trust in eating disorder recovery to support intuitive eating

  • How watching a child’s relationship with food and movement, which is filled with ease, can have a profound impact on how we view our own relationships to food and movement

  • Anne-Sophie’s transition to being an anti-diet coach, including how she began with blogging and podcasting her journey and then eventually made her way her way getting her certifications in coaching

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Food Psych #82: Intuitive Exercise & Overcoming Deprivation with Jonah Soolman

Jonah Soolman - Health at Every Size Dietitian

Fellow anti-diet dietitian Jonah Soolman discusses how being an athletic kid and being restricted from sugar led to a troubled relationship with food, how he learned to trust his body to guide his eating and exercise choices, why food insecurity can lead to a "clean-plate club" mentality, why it's essential for health professionals to adopt the principles of Health at Every Size and intuitive eating, and lots more! 

“What kinds of movements actually feel good for your body? What do you enjoy doing?” [Click to Tweet]

Jonah Soolman is a registered dietitian specializing in the treatment of eating disorders, disordered eating, and cardiometabolic conditions using a HAES perspective. He and his wife, Joanne, co-own Soolman Nutrition and Wellness LLC, a private practice where they offer individualized nutrition counseling, in Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA.

Most commonly, Jonah works with people who have tried numerous diets and are sick of seeing their weight temporarily drop only to inevitably rebound. Fed up with failing diets and being at war with food and their bodies, they come to Jonah because he offers the antithesis. By taking the focus off of weight and rules, he helps them to form a new and more peaceful relationship with food based on satisfaction, flexibility, and health.

When Jonah is not working, he enjoys getting outside and moving his body. In addition to time spent playing NCAA tennis, his proudest athletic achievements include riding his bicycle from Seattle to Boston for charity, running up Mount Washington on four separate occasions, and rebounding from multiple back surgeries to finish the Newport Marathon. Find him online at SoolmanNutrition.com.

 

We Discuss:

  • Jonah’s relationship with food growing up, including a feeling of restriction within the family and the disordered eating that developed for him and his brother as a result

  • The impact of food deprivation on eating disorder behaviors

  • How family food issues get passed down to later generations and impact our behavior around food in social situations, including the concept of “cleaning your plate”

  • Generational differences between how people relate to food, including the deprivation mindset of those who grew up during the Great Depression, as well as the ways in which people of all ages can be impacted in the long-term by deprivation

  • The many ways in which food scarcity can present itself, and how stocking up on foods can help fight the deprivation fear

  • The "honeymoon phase" of intuitive eating, the understandable fear that comes along with allowing foods that were previously off limits, and the eventual food peace and neutrality that comes with legalizing all foods

  • How the stigma against fat bodies is linked to disordered eating

  • The emotional attachments and associations we make with food

  • The experiences that led Jonah to develop some orthorexic tendencies, as well as his eventual career as a dietitian

  • Jonah’s introduction to Health At Every Size, beginning with the realization that athletes of all shapes and sizes were faster than he was while training for a marathon at a young age, as well as professors in his dietetic training who discussed size bias and the concept of “fat but fit”

  • Jonah’s journey into the personal training profession, including the eventual push to include intuitive movement into his philosophy

  • The shift from exercising for weight loss to moving your body for enjoyment, including the concept of intuitive exercise and the use of movement as self-care rather than self-punishment

  • Why comparison can feed our own unhappiness, and how important it is to remember that the person you are comparing yourself to may not be happy themselves

  • The importance of using a weight-neutral approach with intuitive eating, eating disorder recovery, and general nutrition

  • Jonah’s transition to an intuitive eating, body positive, HAES practice, including his realization that diets exacerbate eating disorders and that attempts at weight loss simply don’t work

  • The difficulty of being a HAES dietitian in a diet-driven world, including the difficult transition required by dietitians during early stages of their careers from a diet focus to an intuitive eating focus

 

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Food Psych #81: How to Honor Your Body and Recover from Disordered Eating with Rachel Cole

Rachel Cole - Body Image & Eating Disorder Recovery Coach

Body image coach Rachel Cole shares why we lose touch with our bodies in times of distress, how to start coming back into embodiment, why the 2016 election has caused so much pain for people struggling with food and body issues, how she recovered from eating disorders and embraced body positivity, why feminism and social justice are so integral to making peace with food and your body, and lots more!

“True body positivity is a political movement.” [Click to Tweet]

Rachel Cole is a certified life coach, celebrated teacher, and women’s empowerment expert. She has spent ten years guiding women to identify, understand and feed their truest hungers – at and away from the table. As an eating disorder survivor herself, Rachel speaks with great wisdom, sensitivity, and authority about what it takes to live as a well-fed woman in the modern world. She has traveled across the United States and internationally speaking and teaching to sold-out gatherings of women on how they too can find ease and fulfillment in their lives simply by honoring their own hungers. Rachel holds a Masters Degree in Holistic Health Education and is a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach. Find her online at RachelWCole.com, and read her full blog post, "Stay."

 

We Discuss:

  • The importance of body politics in the body image discussion, including some of the systemic issues that feed into our relationships to our bodies

  • The value in staying present in our bodies when we are faced with difficult feelings, including eating disorder thoughts

  • The struggles many of us face with embodiment, including the reasons we leave our bodies in times of distress and how living in the body of a woman can be particularly difficult

  • How objectification takes agency away from those of us trying to experience embodiment

  • Ways in which we can engage in purposeful embodiment in a curious, non-judgmental way

  • The importance of balancing self-care with intentional engagement

  • How confusing it can be as a person in a helping profession during this turbulent cultural period, and the difficulty of watching clients engage with their own oppression

  • Rachel’s relationship with food and her body growing up, including her eating disorder history and how important getting angry at the systemic issues that feed into eating disorder development was in finding her eating disorder recovery

  • How a parent’s relationship with food and their bodies can impact their children's body image and relationship with food

  • The double-edged sword of exposing diet culture and diving into the body-positive world, including the pro of deprogramming our minds from the diet mindset, but the con of seeing fat shaming, negative body talk, and disordered eating everywhere we go

  • How important it is to remember that the honeymoon phase of intuitive eating eventually ends, and that getting back in touch with our hunger and fullness cues is a long, difficult, but integral part of the eating disorder recovery process

  • The ways in which letting go of weight management is such a big step towards intuitive eating and true eating disorder recovery

  • Rachel’s experience in graduate school, including her transition into orthorexia

  • How seemingly innocuous comments from peers can feed into our perception of ourselves as “healthy” eaters, and can continue to push us towards disordered eating

  • The difficulty of navigating our own relationships with food in relation to other people's behaviors around food, and dealing with the silent judgment when everyone around you is engaging in a restrictive lifestyle

  • Rachel’s journey to her role as life coach focusing on HAES, intuitive eating, and eating disorder recovery

  • The deep need in the nutrition community for more HAES voices

 

"If you can mess it up, it's a diet." [Click to Tweet]

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #76: Body Trust and Competent Eating vs. "Healthy" Eating with Dana Sturtevant of Be Nourished

Dana Sturtevant of Be Nourished

Dana Sturtevant—co-founder of the Be Nourished wellness center in Portland, OR—shares how her desire to be thinner manifested as a child, how a vegetarian friend introduced her to the idea of nutrition, how she began her career as a dietitian in the traditional "weight management" paradigm, what drew her to the Health at Every Size approach, and lots more! 

Dana Sturtevant, MS, RD, is a trainer, mentor, Kripalu Yoga teacher, and dietitian specializing in Health at Every Size® and intuitive eating. She is the cofounder of Be Nourished, a revolutionary business helping people heal body dissatisfaction and reclaim body trust. Dana loves incorporating mindfulness and self-compassion practices into her work. A member of the International Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers, Dana has facilitated more than 300 workshops throughout the United States for health care providers looking to enhance their skills in behavior-change counseling. Her work has been featured in the Huffington Post. Find her online at BeNourished.com

 

We Discuss:

  • Dana’s relationship with food growing up, including the birth of consciousness related to beauty standards and her first experience with body shame and self-restriction

  • How the restrictive messages around food and beliefs about the body reach young children in insidious ways

  • Why food control is a method of emotional coping, rather than just about controlling the body

  • The complicated relationship that women in particular have with their bodies when they enter adulthood, and how the mental energy surrounding body control makes it that much harder for young women to discover their identity

  • Female sexuality, the double standard for women, and the drive to be wanted for our bodies

  • The intersections of feminism and eating disorders, and the impacts of patriarchy on both men and women

  • How the diet industry is shifting, pushing the healthy ideal and changing the focus to the untapped male market

  • The difficulty of addressing orthorexia in dietetics and nutrition practice due to the conflation of health and size

  • Navigating intuitive eating from Dana’s young adulthood and into her current practice, including the concept of pleasure versus nutrition and the introduction of mindfulness

  • Dana’s introduction to nutrition, which began as an exploration into a vegetarian lifestyle

  • Intentionally incorporating the ethics related to food choice while also holding onto strong recovery, and how to make food choices from a place of groundedness versus shame

  • How our reputation and identity can often be heavily tied to our food choices

  • Dana’s transition from weight management to Health at Every Size (HAES) and intuitive eating

  • The ways helpful practices, such as mindfulness and intuitive eating, get co-opted by diet culture and are turned into weight loss and weight management programs

  • How deprivation and restriction can be entirely mental and not seem to manifest in behaviors, but can still bounce back into responsive bingeing behaviors

  • The difference between feeling full and feeling satisfied

  • Nutrition’s place in intuitive eating, including how to make nutrition your ally rather than your opponent in your recovery

  • The work that needs to be done to unlearn weight bias and diet culture

 

Resources Mentioned

Some of the links below are affiliate links. Affiliates or not, we only recommend products and services that align with our values.

 

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