nutrition

Food Psych #120: Secrets to Intuitive Eating & Life Beyond Dieting with Lindsey Averill

Lindsey Averill

Lindsey Averill, writer, activist, and film maker, comes on the show this week to discuss the release of her new movie, “Fattitude,” how she found intuitive eating and discovered body acceptance, the issue of weight discrimination and size bias in media and the medical community, her work in body image, the problem with mainstream body positivity, and more! PLUS, Christy answers a listener question about binge eating and navigating trigger foods in recovery.

Lindsey Averill is many things - a filmmaker, an academic, a writer, an activist, an aspiring novelist, a sake and sushi lover, a notorious trashy television watcher, an odd beauty secret keeper, an amazing dancer... really, the list is endless.  

Lindsey completed her M.F.A in Writing from Emerson College and is A.B.D in the Comparative Studies Ph.D. Program at Florida Atlantic University. The focus of Lindsey’s research is feminism, fat civil rights and the representation of fat bodies in popular culture. Since 2005 Lindsey has worked as a college professor teaching women’s studies, literature and writing courses.

In her spare time, Lindsey writes stuff for lots of cool media outlets, like CNN, xojane, Time.com, The Huffington Post, Alternet, Refinery29, Bustle and the up and coming women’s lifestyle magazine, Muses and Visionaries. Lindsey’s also written academic stuff where she speaks to feminism – or a lack thereof in young adult novels – like Twilight and the Hunger Games.  

Basically, Lindsey is one of those public intellectual types, who has dedicated her life to ending the hateful relationships people have with their bodies and changing the national conversation about body image so that it focuses on effect the very real issues of bias and systemic prejudice. Find her online at FattitudetheMovie.com.

Grab Christy's free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food, to start your intuitive eating journey. You can also text "7STRATEGIES" to the phone number 44222 to get it on the go :)

Join the Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world!

 

We Discuss:

  • Lindsey’s relationship with food growing up, including the urge to diet at a young age

  • The invisibility of anorexia and restrictive tendencies in fat bodies

  • Fatphobia in the medical community and the double standard in care

  • Lindsey’s exploration into fat studies and weightism, and unearthing fat activism

  • The myths surrounding the thin ideal

  • Body changes and romantic relationships

  • Current medical opinions and myths about body weight and pregnancy, and the potential influences of diet culture on pregnancy cravings

  • Navigating intuitive eating and nutrition

  • Finding joyful movement

  • Coping with weight gain in intuitive eating and embracing body acceptance

  • Exploring the joy and pleasure in food

  • Normalizing all kinds of food and overcoming bingeing behaviors

  • Lindsey’s work in media, and her exploration of the representations of women and body image

  • Body image issues among all populations and life stages

  • Watering down body positivity, and ignoring its roots in fat activism

  • Weight-based discrimination and systemic prejudice

  • Lindsey and Viri’s project, "Fattitude"

  • The importance and impact of media representation on internalized weight stigma

 

Resources Mentioned

Some of the links below are affiliate links. Affiliates or not, we only recommend products and services that align with our values.

 

Listener Question of the Week

How do we handle bingeing? Are there foods that we will always have bingeing tendencies with? What if we experience binge eating in a smaller body? Are there ways we can increase satisfaction throughout the day to prevent binges in the first place?

(Resources Mentioned: Christy’s private coaching, Christy’s Intuitive Eating Fundamentals online course, and the Certified Intuitive Eating Counselors Directory)

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Food Psych #110: How to Heal from Food Shame with Casey Berglund

Casey Berglund

Yoga teacher and fellow Health at Every Size dietitian Casey Berglund shares how she overcame restriction and food shame, how she went from having an intuitive relationship with food as a child to trying to manipulate her body size, why yoga was exactly what she needed to break through perfectionism, why she started thinking outside the box in her career, why it's dangerous to approach intuitive eating with a diet mentality, how to navigate diet culture as a professional in the body-acceptance field, and lots more. PLUS, Christy shares some insider insight into nutrition journalism, and answers a listener question about how to handle when a doctor tells you to lose weight "for your health."

Casey Berglund is a registered dietitian, yoga teacher, and media spokesperson who believes all people deserve to feel free in their relationship with food and confident in their bodies, so they have more energy for the important things in life. She owns Worthy and Well Inc., where she inspires smart and soulful women to ditch the all-or-none and eat for fuel, flavour, and fun. Get involved by claiming your free 15-minute Yoga Intro video and checking out Yoga for Mindful Eating and Living at worthyandwell.com.

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Ask a question about intuitive eating, Health at Every Size, body acceptance, or eating disorder recovery for a chance to have it answered on the podcast!

 

We Discuss:

  • Casey’s relationship with food growing up, including her experience farming and gardening

  • The transition from curiosity about nutrition to control and restriction

  • Body comparisons

  • The media’s role in diet culture

  • Perfectionism

  • The need for culture-wide education on disordered eating, the diet mentality, and Health at Every Size

  • The impact of food deprivation on strength and athleticism

  • Discomfort with weight gain, body changes in eating disorder recovery, and finding body acceptance

  • Casey’s and Christy’s experiences in nutrition classes

  • Healthism and orthorexia

  • The feeling of “not enough”

  • Yoga’s role in Casey’s and Christy’s healing journeys, including its potentially triggering aspects such as lack of body diversity and the “clean eating” or vegan trends

  • Restrictive nutrition trends (Paleo, raw food diets, Whole30, juicing)

  • Navigating intuitive eating and self-care-driven health choices

  • Casey’s experience doing her yoga teacher training

  • Combining mindfulness practices and nutrition counseling

  • Health at Every Size and responsible research

  • BMI, the so-called “obesity epidemic,” and fearmongering within nutrition and health journalism

  • The ethical problems with encouraging intentional weight loss

  • Evolving from a weight-management paradigm to an anti-diet paradigm as a dietitian or health professional

  • The need for community and connection

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #109: Body Acceptance and Disability with Anna Sweeney

Anna Sweeney

Fellow Health at Every Size RD Anna Sweeney shares how having a disability has affected her relationship with food and her body, how she's come to terms with the identity of being a disabled person, why anti-diet work is about social justice and equality for *all* bodies (not just those that are considered socially acceptable), why having a loved one with an eating disorder can bring up conflicting emotions, how diet culture permeates mainstream healthcare including eating disorder treatment, and lots more. PLUS, Christy answers a listener question about the early stages of intuitive eating!

Anna Sweeney, MS, RD, LDN, CEDRD is a Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian, who provides nutrition care using a non-diet, Intuitive Eating, and Health at Every Size paradigm. Anna is an expert in providing care for individuals struggling with eating disorders, disordered eating, and body image concerns. Over the last decade, she has served in a supervisory role at multiple eating disorder treatment centers, and currently holds the position of National Director of Nutrition Services for Monte Nido.

Anna is also the owner of Whole Life Nutrition Counseling in Concord, MA, where she works exclusively with clients with eating disorders, disordered eating, or an interest in intuitive eating. Anna is passionate about nutrition, balance and wellness and works to empower her clients to trust their own body wisdom. Find her online at wholelifeRD.com.

 

We discuss:

  • How you can submit your questions for inclusion in the podcast, and today’s question from a listener named Gracie

  • Anna’s intuitive relationship with food growing up

  • The difficult transition of moving from the Midwest to the East Coast

  • Why the transition into puberty causes so much angst about weight and food

  • Anna's journey of getting diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), and how it changed her relationships and feelings about herself and her body

  • Anna’s introduction to nutrition and her interest in eating disorders

  • The limitations of traditional dietetics training on eating disorders and body image issues

  • Why most dietitians start out as part of diet culture

  • Opportunities to do a different type of nutritional counseling

  • Why unlearning is more important than learning when it comes to relating to food

  • Anna's experiment of following a particular diet to treat her MS, and how it affected her relationship with food

  • Why the field of eating disorders needs to do a better job of acknowledging disability and including all bodies 

  • Anna's decision to embrace her identity as a disabled person and speak publicly about disability rights

  • How you can find Anna’s survey for body image and eating disorder treatment professionals

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #108: The Roots of the Body-Positive Movement with Connie Sobczak

Connie Sobczak

Body-image activist Connie Sobczak joins us to discuss recovering from diet culture and body dissatisfaction, her role in creating the concept of body positivity and how HAES and fat acceptance were integrated from the start, the pluses and minuses of the current body-positive movement, why calling it "body neutrality" might work better for some people, why BMI is BS, the beauty ideal and aging, and lots more!

Connie Sobczak is a mentor, writer, educator, and award-winning video producer. Her experience with an eating disorder in her teen years and the death of her sister Stephanie inspired her life’s work to create a world where all people are free to love their bodies. In 1996, Connie brought her vision to life when she created The Body Positive with Elizabeth Scott, LCSW.

Connie is the author of Embody: Learning to Love Your Unique Body (and quiet that critical voice!), a book in which she brings the Be Body Positive Model to life, and skillfully and lovingly reconnects readers to their authenticity and beauty. She is a leader of the movement to prevent eating problems and improve the self-image of youth and adults through her writing, workshops, videos, professional trainings, leadership programs, and speaking engagements.

A California native, Connie currently resides in the San Francisco Bay Area with her partner, Jim. Their daughter, Carmen, is her inspiration and her joy. Find Connie online at TheBodyPositive.org

Grab Christy's free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food, to start your intuitive eating journey. You can also text "FOODPSYCH" to the phone number 44222 to get it on the go :)

Join the Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world!

 

We Discuss:

  • Connie’s relationship with food growing up, including the experience of being a picky eater at a young age

  • Diet culture and body dissatisfaction

  • Puberty and weight gain

  • The normalization of disordered eating behavior

  • Connie’s experience with bulimia

  • Intuitive eating

  • Determining cravings

  • Fear of pleasure

  • Doing body-positive work for the next generation

  • The power of anger in recovery

  • Touch and massage as a form of healing and emotional release

  • Her role in creating the concept of body positivity

  • Body positivity vs. body neutrality

  • Fat acceptance and Health at Every Size

  • Sitting with suffering

  • The beauty ideal and aging

  • Beauty vs prettiness

  • Appreciating mistakes

  • Meditation

  • Intuitive living

  • Embodiment

  • Finding balance through nutrition

  • The importance of cultural competency in health interventions

  • Debunking BMI

  • Bodily autonomy

  • Fatphobia from healthcare providers

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #107: From Disordered Eating to Health at Every Size with Heidi Schauster

Heidi Schauster

Fellow Health at Every Size dietitian Heidi Schauster shares how she overcame restriction and bingeing, why perfectionism fuels the fire of disordered eating, how intuitive eating leads to a peaceful relationship with food, what health professionals need to know about Health at Every Size, how to overcome self-judgment and speak more kindly to yourself, why the thin ideal is so damaging to people's health, and lots more!

Heidi Schauster, MS, RD, LDN is a nutrition therapist and registered dietitian with 20+ years of experience in the field of disordered eating. She is a nutrition counselor, writer, consultant, and clinical supervisor of other registered dietitians, based in the Greater Boston area. Heidi also publishes a seasonal blog called A Nourishing Word. Heidi feels called to assist clients and readers in improving their relationships with food and their bodies. Heidi also has a personal recovery history: she struggled with bulimia, food restriction, and binge-eating in her late teens and early twenties. Now that she is 45 and has been recovered for over two decades, she loves being in her body and in her life. Heidi is passionate about helping others get past obsessions with food, self-criticism, and negative body image. She uses Intuitive Eating principles, a Health at Every Size paradigm, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and mindfulness practices in her work. Heidi is also a life-long dancer, and dance has played a role in both her eating disorder history and her healing. Heidi encourages her clients, when they are ready, to discover conscious, mindful movement -- in order to fully embrace the joy of being connected to a well-nourished, well-cared for body and soul. Find her online at anourishingword.com.

Grab Christy's free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food, to start your intuitive eating journey. You can also text "FOODPSYCH" to the phone number 44222 to get it on the go! 

Join the Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world!

 

We Discuss:

  • Heidi’s relationship with food growing up, and how it changed along with her relationship to ballet and dance

  • Thin privilege

  • Body changes that came along with puberty

  • Binge eating disorder, restriction, and bulimia

  • The value of therapy in eating disorder recovery

  • Heidi’s studies in nutrition and psychology

  • Intuitive movement

  • Self-compassion vs self-judgment

  • Intuitive eating

  • Alternative coping mechanisms vs. emotional eating

  • Reacting to self-criticism

  • Raising daughters in diet culture

  • Heidi’s introduction to Health at Every Size and the body-positive movement

  • Body acceptance

  • Anti-diet activism

  • The HAES community in Boston, MA

  • Treatment of disordered eating from a HAES perspective

  • Fatphobia in the medical community

  • Disclosing our personal food peace and recovery stories while maintaining our own boundaries

  • Never-ending growth and lifelong learning

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #101: How to Honor Your True Hungers & Find Body Acceptance with Rachel Estapa

Rachel Estapa.jpg

Size-acceptance advocate and yoga teacher Rachel Estapa discusses how being a larger-bodied child led to early experiences of shame and dieting, why diet culture's promise to "fix" us is so alluring, the connection between physical and emotional hungers,  why rediscovering her loves and desires in life was essential to her recovery from dieting, how the practice of yoga helped show her the path to liberation, and lots more!

Rachel Estapa, founder of More to Love®, is a certified life coach, certified Kripalu Yoga teacher, writer, speaker and social entrepreneur who educates and supports plus size people on approaches to positive body image and wellness, enabling all bodies to lead more empowered lives. Find her online at MoreToLoveWithRachel.com.

Grab Christy's new free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food. You can also text "FOODPSYCH" to the phone number 44222 to get it on the go!

Join the Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world!

 

We Discuss:

  • Rachel’s relationship with food growing up, including associating food with love and family

  • Body shame in relation to food choices

  • Separating the critical voice from the true inner voice of compassion

  • The line between educating others and preserving our own body-positive journey

  • Reconnecting to body trust

  • How intuitive eating leads to intuitive living

  • Creating a loving relationship with the past

  • Rachel’s first experience with a nutritionist

  • The importance of access to plus-size clothing options

  • Rachel's Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis

  • The connection between physical hunger and emotional hunger

  • Rediscovering satisfaction with food and movement on the intuitive eating journey

  • The impact of patriarchy and misogyny on femme socialization

  • Yoga, eating disorder recovery, and embodiment

  • Reconnecting with and accepting emotions

  • Eating as an intimate act

  • Food as a part of our relationships and human connection

  • Navigating and pushing back against diet culture and the diet mentality

  • Rachel’s reasons for creating More to Love

  • Finding everlasting, honest, and individual body acceptance

  • The intersection of mystery and science

  • Tolerating constant change and growth

  • The trouble with deriving self-worth from external factors

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Food Psych #97: The Life-Changing Magic of Intuitive Eating with Sumner Brooks

Sumner Brooks RD

Body-positive dietitian Sumner Brooks shares why she started bingeing at a young age, how she finally healed her relationship with food through intuitive eating, how diet culture convinces us we're "not good enough," why emotional eating is related to restriction, why it's so important (and difficult) to accept and honor your hunger, how conventional nutrition education leads us astray, and lots more!  

Sumner Brooks is a registered dietitian nutritionist specializing in eating disorders and a Certified Intuitive Eating counselor. She's the producer of the EDRDpro Symposium for professionals, She's also the co-author of the non-diet guidebook Savvy Girl: A Guide to Eating, a short 4 hour-read for women of all ages based on the Intuitive Eating philosophy. Sumner also works at a gastroenterology specialty clinic in Portland, Oregon where she utilizes a non-diet approach to treat patients struggling with digestive concerns and eating disorders. Out of the office she's found soaking up time with her 2 year old daughter and getting outdoors in the beauty of the Pacific Northwest. Sign up for her EDRDpro Symposium for webinars with 15 experts on intuitive eating and Health at Every Size (including Christy!), and find her online at EattoLiveHappy.com.

This episode is brought to you by Plum Deluxe, a Fair Trade tea company that's committed to fostering mindfulness, compassion, and community. Check out their great selection of teas, and help support the podcast with every purchase!

Join the new Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world! 

 

We Discuss:

  • Sumner’s disordered relationship with food from a young age that included bingeing and overeating

  • How food insecurity can impact the way we relate to food

  • Sumner’s experience with emotional eating

  • Coping with the need for more variety and “fun” foods in a restrictive household

  • The '90s fat-free craze

  • Sumner’s struggle to satisfy her hunger as a young athlete

  • How social pressure from our peers can influence and increase disordered eating behavior

  • The ways in which magazines and advertising perpetuate the overwhelming feeling of never being “enough,” and push us to chase the beauty ideal

  • How self-hate and negative body image can act as precursors to eating disorders

  • The role of feminism and body positivity in eating disorder recovery

  • How intimate relationships are impacted by disordered eating behaviors

  • Sumner’s experience with various eating disorders, including the restrict-binge cycle and compulsive exercise

  • The role of depression, loneliness, and stress in eating behavior

  • Therapy for eating disorders

  • Sumner’s experience as a dietitian, and how it guided her own path to food peace and intuitive eating

  • How shame and guilt perpetuate binge eating and the restrict-binge cycle

  • The impact of struggling with biological hunger and emotional hunger simultaneously

  • Making peace with and honoring physical hunger

  • The problem with the calories-in-calories-out nutrition model

  • A dietitian’s role in eating disorder prevention and treatment

  • The Health at Every Size, non-diet approach to nutrition counseling

  • The connection between healthism and disordered eating

  • How to bring people into the intuitive eating, anti-diet, Health at Every Size world

 

Resources Mentioned

Some of the links below are affiliate links. Affiliates or not, we only recommend products and services that align with our values.

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Food Psych #96: How to Trust Your Body & Honor Its Wisdom with Tracy Brown

Tracy Brown RD

Fellow Health at Every Size dietitian Tracy Brown shares why she started dieting and fighting her body in adolescence, how restriction quickly spiraled into an eating disorder, why difficulty with setting boundaries played into her relationship with food, how she found her way to recovery and started down the path to becoming a dietitian, how she began to tune in to her body's wisdom and practice intuitive eating, why she dove into practicing from a Health at Every Size paradigm, and lots more. She also leads us in a special meditation for helping reconnect to your body!

Tracy Brown is a somatic nutrition therapist, registered dietitian, and attuned eating coach in private practice providing in-person, phone and online counseling since 2006. Tracy works with people on a soul level because she believes not wanting to be in the body is a way of protecting oneself, so her work is about nourishing the nervous system to feel safe enough to feel emotion and actually heal. She specializes in the treatment of eating disorders and eating problems for both adults and children, as well as issues related to overextending the body, including adrenal fatigue, hormone issues, PCOS and gut health.

Tracy routinely teaches intuitive eating workshops and disordered-eating-related talks throughout Florida, including at the University of Florida and Santa Fe College in Gainesville, FL; Flager College; and Florida Gulf Coast University in Ft Myers. She is also the guest Nutrition Therapist for Feast, an online intuitive eating program run by past Food Psych guest Rachel Cole. Tracy has appeared on many podcasts discussing topics including intuitive eating, trauma healing, positive body image, and recovery.

She believes that healing food and weight concerns is really about deciding to embrace our humanity in the diverse and amazing bodies we have. Living and feeling fully with courage and being dedicated to the fullest expression of who we are is the point. Learn more about Tracy and her work at TracyBrownRD.com.

This episode is brought to you by Plum Deluxe, a Fair Trade tea company that's committed to fostering mindfulness, compassion, and community. 

Join the new Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world!

 

We Discuss:

  • Tracy’s relationship with food growing up, including a childhood that included farming and exposure to sports at an early age

  • Tracy’s experience with subliminal messages about “acceptable” body size

  • The emotions attached to the dieting experience

  • How dating and socializing impacted Tracy’s ideas of perfection and her understanding of what is valued in our society

  • Tracy’s first experience with a diet and the resulting spiral into disordered eating, restriction, obsessive exercise, and anorexia

  • How eating disorders can be used to create boundaries around us and isolate us from the world

  • Rape culture and consent in the context of bodily autonomy

  • The relationship between eating disorders and control

  • Tracy’s journey through early eating disorder recovery and her introduction to intuitive eating

  • Tracy’s experience in college studying dietetics and nutrition, including studying with the knowledge that she would be following an anti-diet path once she received her degree

  • The impact of deprivation on the restrict-binge cycle

  • How the diet mentality and mental restriction impact the ability to break the binge cycle

  • Tracy’s trials and tribulations trying to find a job in dietetics, and her eventual first supervision under the guidance of an intuitive eating practitioner

  • Tracy’s experience with self-experimentation in learning her own hunger and fullness

  • The role of therapy in eating disorder recovery and intuitive eating

  • Tracy’s transition into private practice and Health at Every Size work, including her frustration with the diet model in mainstream dietetics

  • The challenge that HAES clinicians face in making space for their client’s mourning process around letting go of weight loss

  • Letting go of the instinct to fix problems rather than feel problems

  • How diet culture and fatphobia impact people of all sizes

  • The role of the HAES, body-positive community in supporting people when they doubt the truth about diet culture

  • How nonlinear the recovery and intuitive eating process can be

  • The judgment and moral values we attach to food behaviors

  • Tracy’s use of somatics and meditation to support eating disorder recovery, body acceptance, and inner wisdom

  • How to prepare clients for the diet culture of the outside world and create boundaries around their own process

  • How meditation can help ground the body, center the self, and foster self-compassion

  • How to have gratitude for coping mechanisms that no longer serve us

 

Resources Mentioned

Some of the links below are affiliate links. Affiliates or not, we only recommend products and services that align with our values.

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Food Psych #94: How to Leave the Religion of Dieting with Alan Levinovitz

Alan Levinovitz

Religious scholar and journalist Alan Levinovitz discusses how diet culture is like a religion, why so much modern nutrition advice is dangerous, why we need to think critically about restrictive eating practices, how suspicion of Western medicine can lead people to believe in harmful "miracle cures," why the "nocebo effect" is causing people to unnecessarily demonize particular foods, and lots more.     

Alan Levinovitz received his PhD in religion from the University of Chicago where he specialized in classical Chinese thought. He is now assistant professor of religious studies at James Madison University, where he teaches classes on religion, Chinese philosophy, and the connection between religion and medicine. His journalism focuses on the intersection of religion, science, and culture, and has appeared in The Atlantic, Wired, The Washington Post, Slate, Vox, and elsewhere. He is the author of The Gluten Lie: And Other Myths About What You Eat (mild trigger warning for frank discussion of diets and eating practices). Find him at James Madison University and on Twitter at @AlanLevinovitz.

 

We Discuss:

  • Alan’s enriching and satisfying relationship with food growing up, including his experience with food as an art form

  • Alan’s experience with body image throughout his life, as well as his differing experience in the world due to his male gender identification

  • How ignoring the personal experiences and struggles of people around food and focusing on the logic can make healing one’s relationship with food seem simplistic and easy, even though it is anything but

  • Debunking dieting, and the ways in which the attachment people have to their belief systems around dieting closely resembles the attachment people have to their belief systems around religion

  • The dogma of nutrition and dieting

  • The power of media representation of the body

  • Alan’s journey into religious studies, including his eventual transition into dietary and food studies as a kind of religion

  • The “nocebo effect”… sometimes, if we are told something is going to make us feel bad, it will

  • Some of the restrictive practices of religion, and the intersections of diet culture and religion

  • The decline of religiosity in relation to the ascension of diet culture

  • Eating as ritual

  • How restrictive religious practices can sometimes spark disordered eating and eating disorders

  • The specific practice of Lent, including how some people view Lent as an opportunity to diet

  • The ways in which some of us deceive ourselves in order justify restrictive practices around our food

  • False promises, charismatic hope, and prosperity gospel

  • How the power of the mind can convince us that food is both healing us or hurting us

  • The issue with the ‘holistic’ health movement, including the intense scrutiny against Western and mainstream medicine

  • Self-identity within our food values and dietary practices

  • The seduction and subsequent failure of black and white rules in relation to food, and how to embrace fluidity instead

  • Buddhism as a path to mindfulness, intuitive eating, and eating disorder recovery

  • How important it is to remember that all bodies are individual, and therefore dietary practices that promise to heal and work for everyone should inspire caution

  • The danger in obsessing over productivity, output, and quantifying every aspect of our lives

  • Putting warning labels on diets and exercise tracking devices like FitBits

  • The importance of not pathologizing sadness, bad body image days, and other negative emotions that are just a part of life

 

Resources Mentioned

 

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Food Psych #93: The Truth about Dieting & Health at Every Size with Rebecca Scritchfield & Julie Duffy Dillon

Julie Duffy Dillon - Rebecca Scritchfield - Food Psych

Fellow body-positive RDs Rebecca Scritchfield and Julie Duffy Dillon return for a special episode in honor of NEDA Week and National Nutrition Month! We discuss our new joint campaign #ChangeTheGame, why the nutrition field often plays right into diet culture, why we need to stop prescribing one thing to people with diagnosed eating disorders and another thing to the rest of the population, how dieting messes with your mind, and lots more!

Julie Duffy Dillon is a food behavior expert who helps people enjoy eating again. Award winning with her progressive approach, Julie was featured in TLC’s documentary My Big Fat Fabulous Life. Julie has an active blog on JulieDillonRD.com and a weekly Food Peace Newsletter. Listen to her weekly body positive, diet free, and health promoting podcast Love, Food where she answers listener letters about their complicated relationship with food. Julie received her BS in Nutrition from Ohio University and MS in Mental Health Counseling from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. As a registered and licensed dietitian in North Carolina, she founded BirdHouse Nutrition Therapy a group practice passionate about helping individuals and families recover from eating disorders and PCOS. As a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist (CEDRD), she also supervises dietitians to be eating disorder specialists. Don't miss Julie's previous appearance on Food Psych!  

Rebecca Scritchfield is a well-being coach, registered dietitian nutritionist, certified health and fitness specialist and author of the book, Body Kindness, which Publisher’s Weekly calls “a rousing guide to better health.” Through her weight-neutral mindfulness-based counseling practice, she helps people create a better life with workable goals that fit individual interests. She is the co-founder of Dietitians for Body Confidence, a website and free bi-monthly e-mail dedicated to shared learning among dietitians and future RDNs to improve body image in people they serve. Rebecca has influenced millions through her writing, Body Kindness Podcast, and appearances in over 100 media outlets including NBC Nightly News, CNN, the Today show, the Washington Post, O Magazine, Health, Shape, and many others. She lives in Washington, D.C., where she was recently recognized as one of ten “Supermom” entrepreneurs in the Nation’s Capital. Find her online at RebeccaScritchfield.com, and don't miss her previous episode of Food Psych!

How are you changing the game on diet culture? Share your anti-diet victories with us using the hashtag #ChangeTheGame on your favorite social media platform!  

Join the new Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world!

 

We Discuss:

  • How Rebecca came up with #ChangetheGame, including the realization that dieting is a game, and that we can change the game by refusing to play

  • The resources that are “game changers,” such as Health at Every Size by Linda Bacon or Intuitive Eating by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch

  • How diet culture permeates our lives, and the ways in which diets can directly lead to eating disorder development

  • The biological and psychological impacts of dieting and restriction

  • The seduction of diets, including the fantasy of the life weight loss will bring you

  • How diets set us up to “fail,” and are made to keep us trapped in never-ending weight cycling

  • The consumer culture of dieting, including the way marketing and advertisements target insecurity to sell products

  • Fear mongering around food

  • The role nutritionists and dietitians have in healing the world’s relationship with food

  • Pleasure and food, including the need for pleasure in nutrition and the inevitable result of balance and variety when we approach food with pleasure and compassion

  • National Nutrition Month, including the subtle diet message embedded within this year’s campaign

  • How the diet industry no longer wants to be associated with restriction but rather with health, and how the nutrition industry is implicitly associated with diets

  • How to change a dietitian’s approach to getting people to eat a more balanced diet

  • The importance of interpreting health data in the context of food insecurity, economic inequality, diet history, and social stigma

  • The all-or-nothing, orthorexic-type nutrition information currently being touted by nutritionists and the media alike, and how to combat it with a more flexible approach

  • The need for an intuitive eating, HAES, size-inclusive shift in the dietetics profession, and for the disordered eating within the profession to be addressed

  • The issue of sizeism in the nutrition world, specifically in dietetics education, and the need for more size diversity

  • Weight concerns and the need to shift away from weight-focused wellness to a self-care driven model

  • Letting go of trying to control our bodies, and letting go of diet culture altogether in order to find true happiness

  • Action items for #ChangeTheGame and dismantling diet culture

 

Resources Mentioned:

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Food Psych #91: Becoming an Anti-Diet Dietitian with Jennifer McGurk

Jennifer McGurk, anti-diet dietitian

Body-positive dietitian Jennifer McGurk shares her history of body shame and disordered eating, her journey to recovery, how her career evolved alongside her own relationship with food, why she's fighting to make Health at Every Size training part of the academic requirements for dietitians and other healthcare professionals, how pregnancy changed her relationship with her body, and lots more!

Jennifer McGurk, RDN, CDN, CDE, CEDRD is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist whose mission is to help people heal from diets, and find peace and balance with their food choices. She is the owner of Eat With Knowledge in Nyack, NY. She leads a team of dietitians who support the philosophy, “Feel fabulous about food!”

As a Certified Eating Disorders Registered Dietitian, Jennifer combines her expertise in medical nutrition therapy, psychology, and physiology to help clients understand their eating behaviors, and gain the insight needed to make positive changes for their health. She is an expert in the field of eating disorders and also supervises other Registered Dietitians.

Jennifer has created the business Pursuing Private Practice, along with authoring a book series of the same name, to help other healthcare professionals reach their goal of owning their own business. Pursuing Private Practice: 10 Steps to Start Your Own Business was released in January 2016, and Pursuing Private Practice: 10 Steps to Grow Your Own Business was released in April 2016. She is working on an e-course that will be out April 2017. Find her online at EatWithKnowledge.com or PursuingPrivatePractice.com, and be sure to sign her HAES petition!

Be sure to join the new Food Psych Facebook group to connect with fellow listeners around the world!

 

We Discuss:

  • Jennifer’s relationship with food growing up, including her experience finding joy in food up until diet culture took hold in her teenage years

  • Jennifer’s struggles with body image, and her eventual first weight loss “success” that led her down the path of disordered eating

  • The protective element of thin privilege in our fat-phobic world

  • How the influence of peers can impact our own food and movement choices and potentially encourage dangerous changes

  • Jennifer’s experience with binge eating disorder, including how intense restriction contributed to the development of her eating disorder

  • How bingeing is your body’s way of protecting itself from starvation

  • Jennifer’s experience with an orthorexic mindset (“clean” eating, morality attached to food), including her desire to study nutrition in order to find the “answer” to health and the ways in which nutrition education helped her to see that all foods fit in a balanced life

  • Jennifer’s decision to seek out therapy to help support her eating disorder recovery

  • The importance of eating-disorder-trained dietitians and Health-at-Every-Size-informed dietitians

  • Navigating the world of HAES after coming from a classic dietetics, weight loss background

  • Jennifer’s petition to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in regards to the certification in Obesity and Weight Management from the Commission on Dietetic Registration

  • Jennifer’s transition to being a HAES dietitian, working with clients struggling with eating disorders, and moving into private practice

  • The fear that many dietitians have of letting go of selling weight loss

  • The importance of networking within the HAES community, as well as tailoring marketing to be 100% anti-diet and HAES, rather than straddling the line between weight management and HAES

  • The explosion of the HAES, body-positive, intuitive eating movement, and the potential danger of mainstream intuitive eating and HAES

  • How to approach weight concerns as a HAES, anti-diet dietitian

  • What is really behind the desire to lose weight

  • The myths that weight loss, motherhood, and romantic love will give us immediate life fulfillment

  • Jennifer’s experience as a mother, including body image concerns during her pregnancy and dealing with the postpartum period

  • Understanding that when we want to turn back to dieting or have negative body image thoughts, we are often using our bodies to ignore what’s really going on within

  • The value in sharing our recovery stories and supporting one another by showing we are not alone in our struggles

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #87: How to Trust Your Intuition about Food with Daxle Collier

Daxle Collier - Intuitive Eating Coach

Intuitive eating coach Daxle Collier shares how food insecurity affected her relationship with food, how a series of health problems led her down the path of restrictive dieting, how she got back in touch with her intuition, why perfectionism around food is so destructive, and lots more.

Daxle Collier is an intuitive eating coach who helps people heal their relationship with food and create an authentic self-care practice. She offers remote coaching, online courses, and local San Francisco Bay Area workshops.

Daxle blogs about intuitive eating, mindful eating, self-care, joyful movement, stress reduction, and the process of change. Her work is rooted in mindfulness, self-compassion, and the HAES principles.

She holds a masters in health education with specialization in nutrition from John F. Kennedy University, and has also completed Intuitive Eating Counselor Certification, Training and Supervision with Evelyn Tribole and Coach Training with Linda Bark of Wisdom of the Whole Coaching Academy. Find her online at DaxleCollier.com, and follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

 

We Discuss:

  • Daxle’s relationship with food growing up, which included having a mother who was a chronic dieter, an early intuitive relationship with food despite surrounding influences, and an eventual tumultuous relationship with food that began in her teenage years

  • How Daxle used food and exercise to rebel and to fit in with her friends at school

  • Daxle’s experience with food when she transitioned to college, including exploring vegetarianism and trying to learn how to cook and buy groceries for herself with limited means

  • Medical issues that cropped up for Daxle, which created a complicated relationship with Western medicine and eventually influenced her to explore alternative and holistic health

  • Daxle’s education in “functional nutrition,” including experimenting with the Paleo diet and eventually realizing that this diet was worsening her health

  • The ways in which American culture encourages suffering around our health

  • The danger of experimenting on ourselves with nutrition, and how easy it is to convince ourselves that certain food choices are the “magic bullet” to health, even when we are experiencing the opposite

  • Daxle’s journey to intuitive eating, including her experience doing the counselor training with Evelyn Tribole

  • How being in the Health at Every Size bubble can make us forget that intuitive eating and HAES aren’t the norm in the medical community and our culture as a whole

  • The ways in which learning about mindfulness, self-compassion, and intuition outside of our relationships to food can open us up to the world of intuitive eating

  • How important it is to break down our ideas and assumptions about foods in relation to the diet mentality before we jump into intuitive eating so that we can experience foods in an untainted, non-diet-centric way

  • Daxle’s job as a wellness coach, which does not include telling people what to eat

  • Why intuitive eating is not the “hunger and fullness” diet

  • How to not turn self-care into self-punishment

  • Daxle’s experience with peer support and how her classmates helped facilitate her journey through intuitive eating

  • Daxle’s emergence into the professional world as a health coach, including how she started her own business, and how difficult it can be to market in a world dominated by diet culture

  • The struggles of intuitive eating and letting go of weight loss in our fat-phobic, health-centric society

  • The problem with encouraging the idea that individual health is a personal responsibility, rather than considering the influences and social-justice issues that impact individual health

  • Daxle’s current relationship with food and her body, including the peace she’s found and the social media cleansing she has had to do

  • The question of body love versus body acceptance, especially in the face of chronic pain or disability, and choosing body trust over body hate

  • The systemic issues that create health problems

  • Daxle’s dream of intuitive eating and HAES eventually being the norm rather than progressive


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Food Psych #83: The Truth About Elimination Diets and Orthorexia with Emily Fonnesbeck

Emily Fonnesbeck - Anti-Diet Dietitian

Body-positive dietitian Emily Fonnesbeck shares how her family helped her develop a healthy relationship with food in childhood, why that went awry and led her down the path to orthorexia, how she overcame her disordered eating and discovered Health at Every Size, why she thinks elimination diets and food-sensitivity testing are dangerous for most people, and lots more.

Emily Fonnesbeck is a Registered Dietitian and owns her own private practice in southern Utah. Her nutrition passion consists of helping individuals free themselves from diets, food anxiety, poor body image and obsessive exercise. She has a non-diet, weight-neutral, client-centered approach to help people make peace with food and their bodies. Find her online at EmilyFonnesbeck.com.

 

We Discuss:

  • The increase in oppressive diet culture, healthism, and orthorexic tendencies that are bound to crop up over the next few holiday months

  • Emily’s relationship to food growing up, including a positive and non-restrictive home environment

  • The ways in which Emily’s post-pregnancy experience and introduction to the world of motherhood impacted her body image and led her to excessive exercise and food restriction

  • The ways in which huge life changes stress the body, and how taking control of our eating is a way in which we try to cope

  • How Emily entered the nutrition field, and the ways in which a nutrition education can often feed into orthorexic behaviors

  • Emily’s physical repercussions of undereating and overexercising, which at the time seemed to indicate a failure to adhere to the perfection of “clean” eating, but was really her body giving her warning signs that something was wrong

  • Emily’s experience with the LEAP Program (a program that promotes elimination diets based off of food sensitivity testing), becoming a LEAP Certified Nutritionist, and the ways in which her involvement in that program encouraged her orthorexic behavior

  • Emily’s experience with orthorexia, and how it became an obsessive condition that felt out of her control

  • How often becoming a dietitian is sparked by diet culture and a desire to fix oneself, and as a result when many nutritionists begin practicing they perpetuate disordered eating

  • The ways in which Emily’s orthorexia impacted her relationship with her family, especially her husband’s role in her eating disorder recovery

  • Emily’s experience with therapy and recovery, which helped her tackle her perfectionism and anxiety, taught her how to set boundaries, and asserted that she was enough just as she was

  • The book Intuitive Eating, how instrumental it was in Emily’s recovery, and how it led her to HAES

  • Emily’s time working at a weight loss resort, and how it impacted her own journey as a dietitian and eventual transition to a weight-neutral approach

  • The important process of owning your story and all parts of your journey, including the ugly parts

  • The power of community and surrounding yourself with people who get HAES, body positivity, and anti-diet, weight neutral eating disorder recovery

  • How intuitive eating impacts every part of our lives and supports self-care and self-growth

  • Emily’s integration of HAES into her practice, and the challenge of reassuring clients who are stuck in the diet mentality that HAES and intuitive eating works

  • The importance of removing cultural diet triggers and creating an environment that is conducive to achieving peace with food

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #80: The Truth About "Food Addiction" with Marci Evans

Marci Evans - Food Addiction & Eating Disorders Dietitian

Fellow anti-diet dietitian Marci Evans shares why some people feel "addicted" to food, what the science actually says about so-called food addiction, how intuitive eating and Health at Every Size can help you recover from disordered eating behaviors, why it's so important that eating-disorder specialists NOT also try to sell weight loss, and lots more. 

Marci Anderson Evans MS, CEDRD, cPT is a Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian, ACSM Certified Personal Trainer, certified Intuitive Eating Coach, and owner of Marci RD Nutrition Consulting.

“Food is meant to be pleasurable. We are meant to enjoy it.” [Click to Tweet]

By combining her passion for food, nutrition, and fitness her goal is to take help each of her clients find a healthy and happy relationship with food and exercise. She works exclusively with clients with eating disorders, disordered eating, or those interested in intuitive eating counseling.

Marci has two professional passions. The first is empowering individuals to find a healthy relationship with food, exercise, and their bodies. The second is teaching and supervising dietitians on how to effectively counsel people with eating disorders. Marci finds great satisfaction in utilizing a psychologically informed approach to counseling and feels grateful for a career that helps her to learn and grow every day. 

Find Marci online at MarciRD.com, and learn more about her online training for dietitians

 

“Eating disorder recovery has to go hand-in-hand with Health at Every Size, body positivity, and intuitive eating.” [Click to Tweet]

We Discuss:

  • Marci’s relationship with food growing up, including funny food quirks, her natural inner wisdom relating to food, and the pleasure factor with food

  • Marci’s introduction to dance, food shame, and a preoccupation with “healthy eating”

  • The arc of Marci’s relationship with food as she grew older, including panic over weight gain during puberty, induction into diet culture during her teenage years, and the eventual bingeing of her college years

  • Marci’s reaction to her weight gain, including shame, and how the unconditional kindness and body-acceptance of others helped her to heal

  • Marci’s experience in her nutrition education, which luckily encouraged balance and moderation, and her eventual introduction to Intuitive Eating through an eating disorder treatment center

  • How long eating disorder recovery truly takes

  • The impact that culture has on our relationship to food and our body, and the importance of not including weight management in eating disorder recovery

  • Marci’s immersion into the books and resources surrounding HAES, body positivity, rejecting diet culture, and intuitive eating

  • How intuitive eating and body positivity are often co-opted by the diet industry for marketing purposes, and how navigating the HAES philosophy can be very difficult for private practitioners and clients who are so used to the diet mentality

  • How important it is for dietitians and nutritionists teaching HAES to do their own intuitive eating work, especially as it relates to rejecting the goal of weight loss

  • The ways in which we can self-select the media and conversations we engage in to better ensure that we are surrounded by body-positive messages

  • How intuitive eating seeps into all areas of our lives, including personal relationships

  • Dealing with the health media as a HAES dietitian

  • The complicated topic of “food addiction,” including interpreting food addiction from the perspective of HAES and intuitive eating, interpreting the research in the context of our cultural food beliefs and history, and validating those who feel addicted to food while simultaneously guiding them away from disempowerment

  • The importance of giving people intuitive eating tools before they try legalizing all foods without the proper support

  • How to have realistic expectations for ourselves in eating disorder recovery and intuitive eating practice

 

Resources Mentioned

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Food Psych #79: Intuitive Eating & the Satisfaction Factor with Elyse Resch

Elyse Resch - Intuitive Eating Workbook

Intuitive Eating co-author Elyse Resch shares her history of emotional eating as a child, how going on a diet in her 20s triggered an eating disorder, why studying nutrition science and becoming a dietitian helped her recover, how she got the idea to write an anti-diet book, why satisfaction is so central to intuitive eating, how to raise kids as intuitive eaters, and lots more!  

Elyse Resch, MS, RDN, CEDRD has been in private practice in Beverly Hills as a Nutrition Therapist for 34 years, specializing in eating disorders, Intuitive Eating, and preventative nutrition. She is the co-author of Intuitive Eating (St. Martin's Press, 1995, 1996, 2003, third edition--2012), and is the co-author of Intuitive Eating, audio version, 2009 (Sounds True). She has published journal articles and does regular speaking engagements and extensive press, radio, and internet interviews. She is nationally known for her work in helping patients break free from the diet mentality through the Intuitive Eating process.

Elyse's philosophy embraces the goal of reconnecting with your internal wisdom about eating.  This is the wisdom with which you were born but from which you have become distracted. A reconnection with your intuitive wisdom will help you develop a healthy and satisfying relationship with food and your body. Elyse’s work has been profiled on CNN, KABC, NBC, AP Press, and KTTV television. She is a certified child and adolescent obesity expert, a Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian, and a Fellow of the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals. She was also the treatment team nutritionist on the Eating Disorder Unit at Beverly Hills Medical Center. Find her online at ElyseResch.com, and pre-order her Intuitive Eating Workbook.

 

We Discuss:

  • Reflections on the election, and validating any and all of our difficult, confusing feelings

  • Elyse’s relationship with food growing up, including a generally neutral relationship to food as a child that eventually developed into an eating disorder due to outside influences from peers and loved ones later in life

  • Elyse’s experience in graduate school and how it helped her in her eating disorder recovery

  • How Elyse’s clients’ experiences with weight regain and her exploration of food and psychology prompted a shift to explore weight-neutral nutrition and Health at Every Size (HAES)

  • Christy and Elyse’s reflections on being a part of diet culture at one time in their careers, and how to help nutritionists and dietitians embrace HAES and intuitive eating and let go of the diet mentality

  • Elyse’s approach to advocating for ourselves in the doctor’s office to ensure a non-triggering visit for those in eating disorder recovery

  • The book Intuitive Eating and the concepts of rejecting the diet mentality, understanding diet culture, and letting go of the dream of weight loss

  • Elyse’s experience being an intuitive eating nutritionist in Hollywood, where image is so important and clients are often urged to be underweight

  • How removing magazines and other forms of body-focused media is an important step in removing eating disorder and negative body-image triggers

  • Elyse’s supervision work with counselors training for the Intuitive Eating Certification, including confronting weight bias and diet mentality among professionals

  • Radical acceptance and self-compassion in eating disorder recovery

  • The importance of confronting our own mental health struggles when we decide to enter a field such as counseling that requires us to delve into the mental health of others

  • Raising children as intuitive eaters, including empowering children in their own autonomy and engendering trust to promote food intuition

  • The gray area that is intuitive eating, including the importance of intention rather than perfection

  • Elyse’s evolving relationship with perfectionism, which eventually led to the idea that falling back into diet behavior is never “wrong,” but rather an opportunity to learn and grow

  • The pros and cons of social media, including the issue of comparison and promoting only the best moments of our lives, as well as changing your feed to remove triggering material

  • The new Intuitive Eating Workbook, including how important exercises can be to such a theoretical practice

  • How important satisfaction is in the eating experience, and how we can think about satisfaction as a gentle way into intuitive eating

 

Resources Mentioned

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